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Anogenital Warts in Children

Anogenital Warts in Children Abstract To the Editor.— In the article by Cohen et al1 on anogenital warts in children, the authors conclude that most of their children were at low risk for sexual abuse. Only eight of 73 children examined by them qualified for "suspected or documented abuse" after their evaluation.The first problem with the article is that the criteria for sexual abuse are not detailed. Instead, subjective criteria are employed. Another major problem with their study is that only half of the fathers were available for examination. Since adult men are the most common instigators of sexual abuse in children, examining only half of the fathers provides insufficient evidence to conclude that parental abuse is absent. The role of caretakers and babysitters in the family is also important in determining sexual abuse. However, we are not told the extent to which this avenue was explored, only that such caretakers were References 1. Cohen BA, Honig P, Androphy E. Anogenital warts in children: clinical and virologic evaluation for sexual abuse . Arch Dermatol. 1990;126:1575-1580.Crossref 2. Farrell MK, Billmire ME, Shamroy JA, Hammond JG. Prepubertal gonorrhea: a multidisciplinary approach . Pediatrics. 1981;67:151-153. 3. American Academy of Dermatology Task Force on Pediatric Dermatology. Genital warts and sexual abuse in children . J Am Acad Dermatol. 1984;11:529-530.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Anogenital Warts in Children

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 127 (7) – Jul 1, 1991

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1991.01680060139023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— In the article by Cohen et al1 on anogenital warts in children, the authors conclude that most of their children were at low risk for sexual abuse. Only eight of 73 children examined by them qualified for "suspected or documented abuse" after their evaluation.The first problem with the article is that the criteria for sexual abuse are not detailed. Instead, subjective criteria are employed. Another major problem with their study is that only half of the fathers were available for examination. Since adult men are the most common instigators of sexual abuse in children, examining only half of the fathers provides insufficient evidence to conclude that parental abuse is absent. The role of caretakers and babysitters in the family is also important in determining sexual abuse. However, we are not told the extent to which this avenue was explored, only that such caretakers were References 1. Cohen BA, Honig P, Androphy E. Anogenital warts in children: clinical and virologic evaluation for sexual abuse . Arch Dermatol. 1990;126:1575-1580.Crossref 2. Farrell MK, Billmire ME, Shamroy JA, Hammond JG. Prepubertal gonorrhea: a multidisciplinary approach . Pediatrics. 1981;67:151-153. 3. American Academy of Dermatology Task Force on Pediatric Dermatology. Genital warts and sexual abuse in children . J Am Acad Dermatol. 1984;11:529-530.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1991

References