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ANISOCORIA DURING OPHTHALMODYNAMOMETRY-Reply

ANISOCORIA DURING OPHTHALMODYNAMOMETRY-Reply This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Dr. Loewenfeld's letter was referred to Drs. Jaeger, Weeks, and Duane, who offer the following reply: To the Editor: —Dr. I. Loewenfeld has presented her case. We are pleased she agrees that in the experiments described by us the defect is chiefly in the retinal portion of the afferent arc. The exact quote "the chief defect in the experiments described by them etc." is perhaps a Freudian slip.We readily admit that the pupillary sphincter—indeed the entire iris of a pressurized eye may be functioning abnormally. However, it is unlikely that experiments in cats and dogs with sustained increased intraocular pressure have much relevance to the transient conditions of our studies confined to humans. Nor do we believe the dilated pupil of glaucoma has much in common with our observations.We are not certain what "uncomplicated impairment of the afferent arc" means. If anisocoria is inherently excluded by definition, then http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

ANISOCORIA DURING OPHTHALMODYNAMOMETRY-Reply

ANISOCORIA DURING OPHTHALMODYNAMOMETRY-Reply

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Dr. Loewenfeld's letter was referred to Drs. Jaeger, Weeks, and Duane, who offer the following reply: To the Editor: —Dr. I. Loewenfeld has presented her case. We are pleased she agrees that in the experiments described by us the defect is chiefly in the retinal portion of the afferent arc. The exact quote "the chief defect in the...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1964 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1964.00970010466034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Dr. Loewenfeld's letter was referred to Drs. Jaeger, Weeks, and Duane, who offer the following reply: To the Editor: —Dr. I. Loewenfeld has presented her case. We are pleased she agrees that in the experiments described by us the defect is chiefly in the retinal portion of the afferent arc. The exact quote "the chief defect in the experiments described by them etc." is perhaps a Freudian slip.We readily admit that the pupillary sphincter—indeed the entire iris of a pressurized eye may be functioning abnormally. However, it is unlikely that experiments in cats and dogs with sustained increased intraocular pressure have much relevance to the transient conditions of our studies confined to humans. Nor do we believe the dilated pupil of glaucoma has much in common with our observations.We are not certain what "uncomplicated impairment of the afferent arc" means. If anisocoria is inherently excluded by definition, then

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1964

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