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ANGIOCARDIOGRAPHY IN CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE CORRELATED WITH CLINICAL AND AUTOPSY FINDINGS

ANGIOCARDIOGRAPHY IN CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE CORRELATED WITH CLINICAL AND AUTOPSY FINDINGS WHILE angiocardiography was first introduced in 1937 by Castellanos, Pereiras, and Garcia1 and was perfected as a practical technique by Robb and Steinberg,2 its widespread use as an aid to clinical diagnosis of congenital malformations of the heart has not come about until recent years. Much of the literature written concerning angiocardiography has been collected from studies on older children and adults. There have been few reports, however, in which predominantly infants and young children have been studied.3 In their recent comprehensive review of the subject of angiocardiography, Dotter and Steinberg4 reported that only 32 cases of congenital malformations of the heart of the cyanotic type had been reported prior to their publication in which angiocardiography had been performed and correlated with autopsy findings. It is, therefore, the purpose of this study to present a complete clinical-pathologic correlation with angiocardiographic studies of 34 cases, 25 of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

ANGIOCARDIOGRAPHY IN CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE CORRELATED WITH CLINICAL AND AUTOPSY FINDINGS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1953 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1953.02050070418002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

WHILE angiocardiography was first introduced in 1937 by Castellanos, Pereiras, and Garcia1 and was perfected as a practical technique by Robb and Steinberg,2 its widespread use as an aid to clinical diagnosis of congenital malformations of the heart has not come about until recent years. Much of the literature written concerning angiocardiography has been collected from studies on older children and adults. There have been few reports, however, in which predominantly infants and young children have been studied.3 In their recent comprehensive review of the subject of angiocardiography, Dotter and Steinberg4 reported that only 32 cases of congenital malformations of the heart of the cyanotic type had been reported prior to their publication in which angiocardiography had been performed and correlated with autopsy findings. It is, therefore, the purpose of this study to present a complete clinical-pathologic correlation with angiocardiographic studies of 34 cases, 25 of

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1953

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