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Anesthesiology 1970

Anesthesiology 1970 Abstract THE otolaryngologist is especially aware of the problems of regurgitation and aspiration during general anesthesia. In cases of trauma he must face this possibility in patients who may have recently eaten. In postoperative tonsillar bleeding he must assume that the stomach contains swallowed blood and is a potential aspiration danger, especially during induction. Vomiting during surgery need not be obvious for gastric material to enter the respiratory tract. Blitt et al1 studied this problem in 900 patients who had taken nothing by mouth for at least eight hours. Carmine red, an insoluble, inert, colloidally dispersed organic dye, was given orally to all patients. At the conclusion of the procedure the pharynx was inspected with a laryngoscope. Of the 900 patients, 70 (7.8%) "silently" regurgitated gastric contents. Of those patients who regurgitated, six (8.6%) were found to have aspirated. After reviewing the patients' records, the authors concluded the following: Barbiturates References 1. Blitt CD, Gutman HL, Cohen DD, et al: Silent regurgitation and aspiration during general anesthesia . Anesth Analg 49:707-711, 1970.Crossref 2. Salem RM: Anesthetic management of patients with "a full stomach": A critical review . Anesth Analg 49:47-53, 1970.Crossref 3. Stept WJ, Safar P: Rapid induction intubation for prevention of gastric-content aspiration . Anesth Analg 49:633-635, 1970.Crossref 4. Fanning GL: The efficacy of cricoid pressure in preventing regurgitation of gastric contents . Anesthesiology 32:535-555, 1970.Crossref 5. Schorr JB, Marx GF: New trends in intraoperative blood replacement . Anesth Analg 49:646-651, 1970.Crossref 6. Spoerel WE: A ventilating attachment for the fiber-optic bronchoscope . Anesthesiology 32:561-562, 1970.Crossref 7. Carden E, Chir B, Trapp WG, et al: A new and simple method for ventilating patients undergoing bronchoscopy . Anesthesiology 33:454-458, 1970.Crossref 8. Jordan WS, Graves CL, Elwyn RA: New therapy for postintubation laryngeal edema and tracheitis in children . JAMA 212:585-588, 1970.Crossref 9. Lotfy AO, Amir-Jahed AK, Moarefi P: Anesthesia with Ketamine: Indications, advantages, and short-comings . Anesth Analg 49:969-974, 1970.Crossref 10. Katz RL, Bigger JT: Cardiac arrhythmias during anesthesia and operation . Anesthesiology 33:193-213, 1970.Crossref 11. Schweizer O: The recovery and intensive care unit, a clinical laboratory . Anesthesiology 32:246-254, 1970.Crossref 12. Deane RS, Mills EL: Prolonged nasotracheal intubation in adults: A successor and adjunct to tracheostomy . Anesth Analg 49:89-97, 1970.Crossref 13. Reilly DF: Benign transient swelling of the parotid glands following general anesthesia: "Anesthesia mumps." Anesth Analg 49:560-563, 1970.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1972 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1972.00770090404018
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract THE otolaryngologist is especially aware of the problems of regurgitation and aspiration during general anesthesia. In cases of trauma he must face this possibility in patients who may have recently eaten. In postoperative tonsillar bleeding he must assume that the stomach contains swallowed blood and is a potential aspiration danger, especially during induction. Vomiting during surgery need not be obvious for gastric material to enter the respiratory tract. Blitt et al1 studied this problem in 900 patients who had taken nothing by mouth for at least eight hours. Carmine red, an insoluble, inert, colloidally dispersed organic dye, was given orally to all patients. At the conclusion of the procedure the pharynx was inspected with a laryngoscope. Of the 900 patients, 70 (7.8%) "silently" regurgitated gastric contents. Of those patients who regurgitated, six (8.6%) were found to have aspirated. After reviewing the patients' records, the authors concluded the following: Barbiturates References 1. Blitt CD, Gutman HL, Cohen DD, et al: Silent regurgitation and aspiration during general anesthesia . Anesth Analg 49:707-711, 1970.Crossref 2. Salem RM: Anesthetic management of patients with "a full stomach": A critical review . Anesth Analg 49:47-53, 1970.Crossref 3. Stept WJ, Safar P: Rapid induction intubation for prevention of gastric-content aspiration . Anesth Analg 49:633-635, 1970.Crossref 4. Fanning GL: The efficacy of cricoid pressure in preventing regurgitation of gastric contents . Anesthesiology 32:535-555, 1970.Crossref 5. Schorr JB, Marx GF: New trends in intraoperative blood replacement . Anesth Analg 49:646-651, 1970.Crossref 6. Spoerel WE: A ventilating attachment for the fiber-optic bronchoscope . Anesthesiology 32:561-562, 1970.Crossref 7. Carden E, Chir B, Trapp WG, et al: A new and simple method for ventilating patients undergoing bronchoscopy . Anesthesiology 33:454-458, 1970.Crossref 8. Jordan WS, Graves CL, Elwyn RA: New therapy for postintubation laryngeal edema and tracheitis in children . JAMA 212:585-588, 1970.Crossref 9. Lotfy AO, Amir-Jahed AK, Moarefi P: Anesthesia with Ketamine: Indications, advantages, and short-comings . Anesth Analg 49:969-974, 1970.Crossref 10. Katz RL, Bigger JT: Cardiac arrhythmias during anesthesia and operation . Anesthesiology 33:193-213, 1970.Crossref 11. Schweizer O: The recovery and intensive care unit, a clinical laboratory . Anesthesiology 32:246-254, 1970.Crossref 12. Deane RS, Mills EL: Prolonged nasotracheal intubation in adults: A successor and adjunct to tracheostomy . Anesth Analg 49:89-97, 1970.Crossref 13. Reilly DF: Benign transient swelling of the parotid glands following general anesthesia: "Anesthesia mumps." Anesth Analg 49:560-563, 1970.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1972

References