Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Anemia of Azaribine in the Treatment of Psoriasis

Anemia of Azaribine in the Treatment of Psoriasis Abstract • Azaribine is an effective agent in the treatment of psoriasis. In this investigation the extent of clinical dermatologic remission appeared to correlate with the degree of metabolic block induced by 6-azauridylic acid, as quantitated by the urinary excretion of orotic acid and orotidine, and the development of anemia. Following azaribine therapy there was a coordinate rise of the specific activities of erythrocyte orotate phosphoribosyltransferase and orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase. There was no correlation between the pretreatment activity of these enzymes and the clinical response to azaribine. The anemia of azaribine therapy was mild and of a megaloblastic type. Uridine effectively corrected the azaribine-induced anemia, but led to exacerbation of the patients' psoriasis. Following uridine therapy there was a reduction in the urinary excretion of orotic acid and orotidine, presumably reflecting end-product inhibition or repression of the first steps of a repeated pyrimidine biosynthesis. (Arch Dermatol 112:1717-1723, 1976) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Anemia of Azaribine in the Treatment of Psoriasis

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/anemia-of-azaribine-in-the-treatment-of-psoriasis-13Xb4UN4Yn
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1976 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1976.01630370005001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • Azaribine is an effective agent in the treatment of psoriasis. In this investigation the extent of clinical dermatologic remission appeared to correlate with the degree of metabolic block induced by 6-azauridylic acid, as quantitated by the urinary excretion of orotic acid and orotidine, and the development of anemia. Following azaribine therapy there was a coordinate rise of the specific activities of erythrocyte orotate phosphoribosyltransferase and orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase. There was no correlation between the pretreatment activity of these enzymes and the clinical response to azaribine. The anemia of azaribine therapy was mild and of a megaloblastic type. Uridine effectively corrected the azaribine-induced anemia, but led to exacerbation of the patients' psoriasis. Following uridine therapy there was a reduction in the urinary excretion of orotic acid and orotidine, presumably reflecting end-product inhibition or repression of the first steps of a repeated pyrimidine biosynthesis. (Arch Dermatol 112:1717-1723, 1976)

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1976

There are no references for this article.