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ANATOMIC BASIS FOR THE STUDY OF SPLANCHNOPTOSIS: THE PATHS OF VISCERAL DESCENT; A PRELIMINARY REPORT

ANATOMIC BASIS FOR THE STUDY OF SPLANCHNOPTOSIS: THE PATHS OF VISCERAL DESCENT; A PRELIMINARY REPORT Abstract EN MASSE DESCENT OF THE VISCERA In ptosis en masse, the abdominal visceral mass moves downward and forward, pushing the incompetent walls before it, without at first causing much change in the interrelations of the viscera, except that the more movable organs tend to descend farther and more rapidly than the less movable ones. This process is seen in its simplest form with the subject lying in the recumbent position when the descent of the diaphragm is insufficiently antagonized (fig. 4, c, in a preceding paper1).In the supine position gravity acts in a ventrodorsal direction, and, for a time, offers an obstacle to mass descent, since it tends to hold the viscera toward their attachments to the posterior wall of the abdomen, while at the same time it reenforces the retaining powers of the anterior abdominal walls (fig. 1 A). In the lateral recumbent position the direction of References 1. Vietor, Agnes C.: The Anatomical Basis for the Study of Splanchnoptosis; Ptosis en Masse and Its Relation to the Body Form , New England J. Med. 206:1137 ( (June 2) ) 1932.Crossref 2. Vietor, Agnes C.: The Anatomical Basis for the Study of Splanchnoptosis; the Abdominal Walls at Term , Surg., Gynec. & Obst. 46:605 ( (May) ) 1928 3. Bull. Lying-In Hosp. New York 13:179 ( (Aug.) ) 1928. 4. Vietor, Agnes C.: (a) The Fundamental Cause of Splanchnoptosis—Abdominal Incompetence; a Developmental Factor. A study of Certain Details of the Prenatal Evolution of the Abdomen, with Special Reference to the Status at Term , Bull. Lying-In Hosp. New York 12:139, 1923 5. 13:1, 1924 6. (b) The Anatomical Basis for the Study of Splanchnoptosis; the Abdominal Viscera at Term , Surg., Gynec. & Obst. 43:293, 1926. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

ANATOMIC BASIS FOR THE STUDY OF SPLANCHNOPTOSIS: THE PATHS OF VISCERAL DESCENT; A PRELIMINARY REPORT

Archives of Surgery , Volume 28 (4) – Apr 1, 1934

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1934 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1934.01170160045002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract EN MASSE DESCENT OF THE VISCERA In ptosis en masse, the abdominal visceral mass moves downward and forward, pushing the incompetent walls before it, without at first causing much change in the interrelations of the viscera, except that the more movable organs tend to descend farther and more rapidly than the less movable ones. This process is seen in its simplest form with the subject lying in the recumbent position when the descent of the diaphragm is insufficiently antagonized (fig. 4, c, in a preceding paper1).In the supine position gravity acts in a ventrodorsal direction, and, for a time, offers an obstacle to mass descent, since it tends to hold the viscera toward their attachments to the posterior wall of the abdomen, while at the same time it reenforces the retaining powers of the anterior abdominal walls (fig. 1 A). In the lateral recumbent position the direction of References 1. Vietor, Agnes C.: The Anatomical Basis for the Study of Splanchnoptosis; Ptosis en Masse and Its Relation to the Body Form , New England J. Med. 206:1137 ( (June 2) ) 1932.Crossref 2. Vietor, Agnes C.: The Anatomical Basis for the Study of Splanchnoptosis; the Abdominal Walls at Term , Surg., Gynec. & Obst. 46:605 ( (May) ) 1928 3. Bull. Lying-In Hosp. New York 13:179 ( (Aug.) ) 1928. 4. Vietor, Agnes C.: (a) The Fundamental Cause of Splanchnoptosis—Abdominal Incompetence; a Developmental Factor. A study of Certain Details of the Prenatal Evolution of the Abdomen, with Special Reference to the Status at Term , Bull. Lying-In Hosp. New York 12:139, 1923 5. 13:1, 1924 6. (b) The Anatomical Basis for the Study of Splanchnoptosis; the Abdominal Viscera at Term , Surg., Gynec. & Obst. 43:293, 1926.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1934

References