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Anastomoses Between Synthetic Graft and Artery: A Study of Tensile Strength

Anastomoses Between Synthetic Graft and Artery: A Study of Tensile Strength Abstract Although there have been extensive tests made of the retention or loss of tensile strength of various synthetic fabrics used as arterial grafts, no controlled experiments have been reported of the strength of the anastomotic bond between synthetic graft and host vessel. Such an investigation was deemed important because of the occasional late development of partial disruption at the suture line between graft and host vessel with formation of a false aneurysm. It has been postulated that such disruptions occur from the failure of a strong bond to develop between graft and host, which gives way completely when silk suture weakens and finally breaks. This study was planned to determine the strength of the anastomotic bond in experimental animals and in man many months after grafting, and to determine if the strength of this bond was dependent on the residual tensile strength of suture material. Methods A. Animal Experiments. —Teflon http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Anastomoses Between Synthetic Graft and Artery: A Study of Tensile Strength

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1963 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1963.01310090127023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Although there have been extensive tests made of the retention or loss of tensile strength of various synthetic fabrics used as arterial grafts, no controlled experiments have been reported of the strength of the anastomotic bond between synthetic graft and host vessel. Such an investigation was deemed important because of the occasional late development of partial disruption at the suture line between graft and host vessel with formation of a false aneurysm. It has been postulated that such disruptions occur from the failure of a strong bond to develop between graft and host, which gives way completely when silk suture weakens and finally breaks. This study was planned to determine the strength of the anastomotic bond in experimental animals and in man many months after grafting, and to determine if the strength of this bond was dependent on the residual tensile strength of suture material. Methods A. Animal Experiments. —Teflon

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1963

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