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ANALYSIS OF THE THINKING DISORDER IN A CASE OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

ANALYSIS OF THE THINKING DISORDER IN A CASE OF SCHIZOPHRENIA Abstract In attempting to characterize successive stages in the development of thinking, one has often made the distinction between concrete, situational thinking and abstract, conceptual or categorial thinking. In the first the person's thinking and acting are directly determined by the immediate situation in its concreteness and singularity; in the second the person tries to master the situation by applying to it certain categories or concepts. These two ways of perceiving the world, which have repeatedly been described as the two major stages in the development both of the individual person and of society or culture, have been used also for characterization of certain pathologic conditions. Gelb and Goldstein have convincingly demonstrated that in patients with cerebral lesions there is a striking loss of the conceptual approach to the world, or of the "categorial attitude," as they termed it. They showed how this loss accounts both for changes in the patient's References 1. Storch, A.: The Primitive Archaic Forms of Inner Experience and Thought in Schizophrenia , Nervous and Mental Disease Monograph 36, New York, Nervous and Mental Disease Publishing Company, 1924. 2. Bychowski, G.: Certain Problems of Schizophrenia in the Light of Cerebral Pathology , J. Nerv. & Ment. Dis. 81:280, 1935. 3. Vigotsky, L. S.: Thought in Schizophrenia , Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 31:1063 ( (May) ) 1934. 4. Kasanin, J., and Hanfmann, E.: An Experimental Study of Concept Formation in Schizophrenia , Am. J. Psychiat. 95:35, 1938. 5. Bolles, M., and Goldstein, K.: A Study of the Impairment of "Abstract Behavior" in Schizophrenic Patients , Psychiatric Quart. 12:42, 1938. 6. Cameron, N.: Reasoning, Regression and Communication in Schizophrenics , Psychological Monograph 221, Columbus, Ohio, Psychological Review Company, 1938, vol. 50, no. 1. 7. Weigl, E.: Zur Psychologie sogenannter Abstraktionprozesse: I. Untersuchungen über das "Ordnen," Ztschr. f. Psychol. 103:1, 1927. 8. Gelb, A., and Goldstein, K.: Ueber Farbennamenamnesie , Psychol. Forsch. 6:127, 1924. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry American Medical Association

ANALYSIS OF THE THINKING DISORDER IN A CASE OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry , Volume 41 (3) – Mar 1, 1939

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1939 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6754
DOI
10.1001/archneurpsyc.1939.02270150142013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In attempting to characterize successive stages in the development of thinking, one has often made the distinction between concrete, situational thinking and abstract, conceptual or categorial thinking. In the first the person's thinking and acting are directly determined by the immediate situation in its concreteness and singularity; in the second the person tries to master the situation by applying to it certain categories or concepts. These two ways of perceiving the world, which have repeatedly been described as the two major stages in the development both of the individual person and of society or culture, have been used also for characterization of certain pathologic conditions. Gelb and Goldstein have convincingly demonstrated that in patients with cerebral lesions there is a striking loss of the conceptual approach to the world, or of the "categorial attitude," as they termed it. They showed how this loss accounts both for changes in the patient's References 1. Storch, A.: The Primitive Archaic Forms of Inner Experience and Thought in Schizophrenia , Nervous and Mental Disease Monograph 36, New York, Nervous and Mental Disease Publishing Company, 1924. 2. Bychowski, G.: Certain Problems of Schizophrenia in the Light of Cerebral Pathology , J. Nerv. & Ment. Dis. 81:280, 1935. 3. Vigotsky, L. S.: Thought in Schizophrenia , Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 31:1063 ( (May) ) 1934. 4. Kasanin, J., and Hanfmann, E.: An Experimental Study of Concept Formation in Schizophrenia , Am. J. Psychiat. 95:35, 1938. 5. Bolles, M., and Goldstein, K.: A Study of the Impairment of "Abstract Behavior" in Schizophrenic Patients , Psychiatric Quart. 12:42, 1938. 6. Cameron, N.: Reasoning, Regression and Communication in Schizophrenics , Psychological Monograph 221, Columbus, Ohio, Psychological Review Company, 1938, vol. 50, no. 1. 7. Weigl, E.: Zur Psychologie sogenannter Abstraktionprozesse: I. Untersuchungen über das "Ordnen," Ztschr. f. Psychol. 103:1, 1927. 8. Gelb, A., and Goldstein, K.: Ueber Farbennamenamnesie , Psychol. Forsch. 6:127, 1924.

Journal

Archives of Neurology & PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1939

References