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AN OUTBREAK OF POLIOENCEPHALITIS AMONG NAVY CADETS, POSSIBLY FOOD BORNE

AN OUTBREAK OF POLIOENCEPHALITIS AMONG NAVY CADETS, POSSIBLY FOOD BORNE During the first week of September 1943 at a naval training school situated on the campus of a West Coast civilian educational institution 14 cases of clinical poliomyelitis developed. These cases were observed, diagnosed and treated at a nearby army station hospital. At the same time 3 other paralytic cases occurred at two navy flight training fields in an adjoining state among graduates who had left the aforementioned training school less than six days before the onset of symptoms. Another paralytic patient, the girl friend of 1 of the graduate patients, who had attended the school commencement, also became ill at the same time as the others. It is considered that the source of infection was probably common to all 18 clinically diagnosed cases. In addition to this group of recognized cases there were several others hospitalized as suspect cases and discharged when spinal fluid tests were found negative. It http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

AN OUTBREAK OF POLIOENCEPHALITIS AMONG NAVY CADETS, POSSIBLY FOOD BORNE

JAMA , Volume 131 (7) – Jun 15, 1946

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1946 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1946.02870240001001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

During the first week of September 1943 at a naval training school situated on the campus of a West Coast civilian educational institution 14 cases of clinical poliomyelitis developed. These cases were observed, diagnosed and treated at a nearby army station hospital. At the same time 3 other paralytic cases occurred at two navy flight training fields in an adjoining state among graduates who had left the aforementioned training school less than six days before the onset of symptoms. Another paralytic patient, the girl friend of 1 of the graduate patients, who had attended the school commencement, also became ill at the same time as the others. It is considered that the source of infection was probably common to all 18 clinically diagnosed cases. In addition to this group of recognized cases there were several others hospitalized as suspect cases and discharged when spinal fluid tests were found negative. It

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 15, 1946

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