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AN INVESTIGATION OF THE PRENATAL FACTOR IN THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF INFANTS TO RICKETS

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE PRENATAL FACTOR IN THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF INFANTS TO RICKETS It has long been recognized that there is a distinct individual susceptibility to the development of rickets—that infants brought up apparently under the same environment and given the same diet differ markedly in their tendency to develop this disorder. Formerly, clinicians were content to call attention to this phenomenon, but recently children's specialists and biochemists have attempted to harmonize this observation with the newer knowledge, and have predicated a prenatal lack of the antirachitic factor in infants who showed a predisposition to rickets and, on the other hand, a storage in those who showed no such tendency. The analogy for this hypothesis is the well known theory of Bunge in relation to anemia. It will be remembered that this physiologist ascribed the development of anemia in later infancy, and the vulnerability of certain infants in particular, to a lack of an "Eisendepot" in the liver. Similarly, in regard to rickets, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE PRENATAL FACTOR IN THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF INFANTS TO RICKETS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1928 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1928.01920290094004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It has long been recognized that there is a distinct individual susceptibility to the development of rickets—that infants brought up apparently under the same environment and given the same diet differ markedly in their tendency to develop this disorder. Formerly, clinicians were content to call attention to this phenomenon, but recently children's specialists and biochemists have attempted to harmonize this observation with the newer knowledge, and have predicated a prenatal lack of the antirachitic factor in infants who showed a predisposition to rickets and, on the other hand, a storage in those who showed no such tendency. The analogy for this hypothesis is the well known theory of Bunge in relation to anemia. It will be remembered that this physiologist ascribed the development of anemia in later infancy, and the vulnerability of certain infants in particular, to a lack of an "Eisendepot" in the liver. Similarly, in regard to rickets,

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1928

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