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An Introduction to the Mind in Health and Disease.

An Introduction to the Mind in Health and Disease. The author offers this book "in the hope that it may stimulate students in studying the many excellent textbooks now written on the subject and give a prop or two to the general practitioner in forming an opinion on the many cases of psychic origin, especially vagotonia, which come under his observation in his daily round." The introductory chapters contain several excellent colored diagrams; in addition, there is a fairly good outline of the vegetative nervous system. For the rest this book seems to be a collection of Freudian definitions—everything, from a corn to the gravest form of insanity is given a Freudian interpretation. The short paragraphs descriptive of the classic types of insanity are well done, but etiologic guesses are made at random. For instance, he says, "The origin of a large number of mental disorders is found in the disturbed equilibrium of the hormones of the organism as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

An Introduction to the Mind in Health and Disease.

JAMA , Volume 85 (14) – Oct 3, 1925

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1925 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1925.02670140069035
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The author offers this book "in the hope that it may stimulate students in studying the many excellent textbooks now written on the subject and give a prop or two to the general practitioner in forming an opinion on the many cases of psychic origin, especially vagotonia, which come under his observation in his daily round." The introductory chapters contain several excellent colored diagrams; in addition, there is a fairly good outline of the vegetative nervous system. For the rest this book seems to be a collection of Freudian definitions—everything, from a corn to the gravest form of insanity is given a Freudian interpretation. The short paragraphs descriptive of the classic types of insanity are well done, but etiologic guesses are made at random. For instance, he says, "The origin of a large number of mental disorders is found in the disturbed equilibrium of the hormones of the organism as

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 3, 1925

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