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AN INTERPRETATION OF THE SEASONAL VARIATION OF RICKETS

AN INTERPRETATION OF THE SEASONAL VARIATION OF RICKETS The Medical Research Committee of Great Britain, in its report on rickets, published in 1918, came to the conclusion that "in spite of a most varied and extensive research we have practically no real knowledge of the nature or causation of this widespread malady, or of the factors which determine its onset."1 There are two widely divergent theories as to its etiology—the hygienic and the dietetic, the pendulum swinging sometimes in the one and sometimes in the other direction. As will be remembered, Kassowitz, one of the best known students of this disorder, maintained the opinion that rickets came about from breathing noxious gases, which accumulated in cadly ventilated rooms.2 Von Hansemann ascribed its development to "domestication," including under this broad term all the harmful influences which result from modern civilization.3 Findlay and Paton, in the report just referred to, emphasize the etiologic importance of inadequate air http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

AN INTERPRETATION OF THE SEASONAL VARIATION OF RICKETS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1921 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1921.04120020083006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Medical Research Committee of Great Britain, in its report on rickets, published in 1918, came to the conclusion that "in spite of a most varied and extensive research we have practically no real knowledge of the nature or causation of this widespread malady, or of the factors which determine its onset."1 There are two widely divergent theories as to its etiology—the hygienic and the dietetic, the pendulum swinging sometimes in the one and sometimes in the other direction. As will be remembered, Kassowitz, one of the best known students of this disorder, maintained the opinion that rickets came about from breathing noxious gases, which accumulated in cadly ventilated rooms.2 Von Hansemann ascribed its development to "domestication," including under this broad term all the harmful influences which result from modern civilization.3 Findlay and Paton, in the report just referred to, emphasize the etiologic importance of inadequate air

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1921

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