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An In-Line Filter for Intravenous Solutions

An In-Line Filter for Intravenous Solutions Abstract The greatest hazard during long-term intravenous therapy is infection. Phlebitis, catheter sepsis, pyrogenic reactions, and septicemia frequently occur, complicating recovery of the severely ill patient requiring prolonged parenteral support. Contaminants may enter the blood stream with the initial venipuncture or subsequently migrate along the tract created by the infusion needle or indwelling polyethylene catheter.1,2 However, a usually unsuspected source of infection is the parenteral fluid, which readily supports bacterial and fungal growth3 and has direct access to the blood stream. This report describes the use of an in-line final filter to insure solution sterility during prolonged intravenous therapy. Materials and Methods The filter, a thin porous membrane composed of pure inert cellulose esters, is housed in a lightweight styrene holder which is easily secured to the patient with adhesive tape or a plastic arm band (Figure). By interposing the unit between the infusion tubing and needle or indwelling References 1. Smits, H., and Freedman, L.R.: Prolonged Venous Catheterization as a Cause of Sepsis , New Eng J Med 276:1229-1233 ( (June 1) ) 1967.Crossref 2. Collings, R.N., et al: Risks of Local and Systemic Infection With Polyethylene Intravenous Catheters , New Eng J Med 279:340-343 ( (Aug 15) ) 1968.Crossref 3. Michaels, L., and Ruebner, B.: Growth of Bacteria in Intravenous Infusion Fluids , Lancet 1:772-774 ( (April 18) ) 1953.Crossref 4. Garvin, J.M., and Gunner, B.W.: The Harmful Effects of Particles in Intravenous Fluids , Med J Aust 2:1-6 ( (July 4) ) 1964. 5. Lockhart, J.D.: Proceedings of the National Symposium on Safety of Large Volume Parenteral Solutions, Washington, DC, Food and Drug Administration, US Dept of Health, Education, and Welfare, 1967, pp 28-30. 6. Wilmore, D.W.; and Dudrick, S.J.: Safe Long-Term Venous Catheterization , Arch Surg 98:256-258 ( (Feb) ) 1969.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

An In-Line Filter for Intravenous Solutions

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1969 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1969.01340160042009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The greatest hazard during long-term intravenous therapy is infection. Phlebitis, catheter sepsis, pyrogenic reactions, and septicemia frequently occur, complicating recovery of the severely ill patient requiring prolonged parenteral support. Contaminants may enter the blood stream with the initial venipuncture or subsequently migrate along the tract created by the infusion needle or indwelling polyethylene catheter.1,2 However, a usually unsuspected source of infection is the parenteral fluid, which readily supports bacterial and fungal growth3 and has direct access to the blood stream. This report describes the use of an in-line final filter to insure solution sterility during prolonged intravenous therapy. Materials and Methods The filter, a thin porous membrane composed of pure inert cellulose esters, is housed in a lightweight styrene holder which is easily secured to the patient with adhesive tape or a plastic arm band (Figure). By interposing the unit between the infusion tubing and needle or indwelling References 1. Smits, H., and Freedman, L.R.: Prolonged Venous Catheterization as a Cause of Sepsis , New Eng J Med 276:1229-1233 ( (June 1) ) 1967.Crossref 2. Collings, R.N., et al: Risks of Local and Systemic Infection With Polyethylene Intravenous Catheters , New Eng J Med 279:340-343 ( (Aug 15) ) 1968.Crossref 3. Michaels, L., and Ruebner, B.: Growth of Bacteria in Intravenous Infusion Fluids , Lancet 1:772-774 ( (April 18) ) 1953.Crossref 4. Garvin, J.M., and Gunner, B.W.: The Harmful Effects of Particles in Intravenous Fluids , Med J Aust 2:1-6 ( (July 4) ) 1964. 5. Lockhart, J.D.: Proceedings of the National Symposium on Safety of Large Volume Parenteral Solutions, Washington, DC, Food and Drug Administration, US Dept of Health, Education, and Welfare, 1967, pp 28-30. 6. Wilmore, D.W.; and Dudrick, S.J.: Safe Long-Term Venous Catheterization , Arch Surg 98:256-258 ( (Feb) ) 1969.Crossref

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1969

References