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AN IMPROVED METHOD OF DETECTING CASTS IN THE URINE.

AN IMPROVED METHOD OF DETECTING CASTS IN THE URINE. This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract As is well known, two methods are in use for obtaining the sediment from urine for the purpose of microscopic examination. The oldest and most frequently used is by natural subsidence. A quantity of the urine is placed in a cylindric or conical vessel and allowed to stand at rest for twelve or twenty-four hours, or even longer, when the sediment thrown down is removed by a pipette and a drop or more of it examined under the microscope. The other method is by the use of the centrifuge; the urine being placed in suitable tubes and subjected to rapid revolution the sediment is quickly thrown to the outer ends of the tubes, from which it may readily be removed by a pipette and placed under the microscope for examination. Each of these methods has its advantages and each its disadvantages. The method by subsidence has the advantage of permitting http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

AN IMPROVED METHOD OF DETECTING CASTS IN THE URINE.

JAMA , Volume XXX (5) – Jan 29, 1898

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1898 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1898.72440570002001a
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract As is well known, two methods are in use for obtaining the sediment from urine for the purpose of microscopic examination. The oldest and most frequently used is by natural subsidence. A quantity of the urine is placed in a cylindric or conical vessel and allowed to stand at rest for twelve or twenty-four hours, or even longer, when the sediment thrown down is removed by a pipette and a drop or more of it examined under the microscope. The other method is by the use of the centrifuge; the urine being placed in suitable tubes and subjected to rapid revolution the sediment is quickly thrown to the outer ends of the tubes, from which it may readily be removed by a pipette and placed under the microscope for examination. Each of these methods has its advantages and each its disadvantages. The method by subsidence has the advantage of permitting

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 29, 1898

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