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An Improved Device for Rapid Hypodermoclysis.

An Improved Device for Rapid Hypodermoclysis. In The Journal for March 3, page 520, Dr. Evan O'Neill Kane illustrates and describes a simple home-made device for rapid multiple infusion—consisting of a rubber bulb, glass medicine-dropper, rubber tubing and needles. The affair is a most useful one, but for other than absolute emergencies is too unstable in composition, both from the fact that after repeated sterilizations the rubber bulb is bound to deteriorate and eventually become useless—possibly just when most wanted—and that leakage is bound to occur at the points where the tubing is drawn through the bulb, possibly permitting the entrance of air at some stage of the operation. Acting on the suggestion contained in Dr. Kane's apparatus, I have had made for me a simple little device that, like the eye-dropper, can be carried about in the pocket, or form part of every surgeon's outfit. It can be sterilized at a moment's notice together with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

An Improved Device for Rapid Hypodermoclysis.

JAMA , Volume XXXIV (20) – May 19, 1900

An Improved Device for Rapid Hypodermoclysis.

Abstract


In The Journal for March 3, page 520, Dr. Evan O'Neill Kane illustrates and describes a simple home-made device for rapid multiple infusion—consisting of a rubber bulb, glass medicine-dropper, rubber tubing and needles. The affair is a most useful one, but for other than absolute emergencies is too unstable in composition, both from the fact that after repeated sterilizations the rubber bulb is bound to deteriorate and eventually become useless—possibly just when most...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1900 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1900.24610200031017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In The Journal for March 3, page 520, Dr. Evan O'Neill Kane illustrates and describes a simple home-made device for rapid multiple infusion—consisting of a rubber bulb, glass medicine-dropper, rubber tubing and needles. The affair is a most useful one, but for other than absolute emergencies is too unstable in composition, both from the fact that after repeated sterilizations the rubber bulb is bound to deteriorate and eventually become useless—possibly just when most wanted—and that leakage is bound to occur at the points where the tubing is drawn through the bulb, possibly permitting the entrance of air at some stage of the operation. Acting on the suggestion contained in Dr. Kane's apparatus, I have had made for me a simple little device that, like the eye-dropper, can be carried about in the pocket, or form part of every surgeon's outfit. It can be sterilized at a moment's notice together with

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 19, 1900

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