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Ampicillin or Penicillin for Otitis Media: A Controversy Further Clarified

Ampicillin or Penicillin for Otitis Media: A Controversy Further Clarified Abstract To the Editor.—The article by Bass and associates (125:397-402, 1973) and editorial by Stickler (125:403, 1973) in the March issue of the Journal concerning treatment regimens and therapeutic trials in acute otitis media is of considerable interest to pediatric house officers, who are in the position of dealing daily with the entity and treating it under circumstances often not conducive to patient compliance. I agree with Dr. Stickler's preference for the use of intramuscularly administered penicillin over orally administered ampicillin (regarding diarrheal complications), and I agree with him that the recommendations of Bass and associates do not follow clearly from their conclusions. However, the methods used by Bass and his colleagues, as well as by Dr. Stickler in a previous study1 both fail to distinguish etiologic agents. Nilson and co-workers2 studied 306 children with acute otitis media and compared penicillin phenoxymethyl, penicillin plus sulfisoxazoles, and ampicillin trihydrate. References 1. Stickler, et al: Treatment of acute otitis media in children . Am J Dis Child 114:123-130, 1967.Crossref 2. Nilson, et al: Acute otitis media: Treatment results in relation to bacterial etiology . Pediatrics 43:351-358, 1969. 3. Charney E: Patient-doctor communication: Implications for the clinician . Pediatr Clin North Am 19:263-279, 1972. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Ampicillin or Penicillin for Otitis Media: A Controversy Further Clarified

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1973 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1973.02110190575029
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.—The article by Bass and associates (125:397-402, 1973) and editorial by Stickler (125:403, 1973) in the March issue of the Journal concerning treatment regimens and therapeutic trials in acute otitis media is of considerable interest to pediatric house officers, who are in the position of dealing daily with the entity and treating it under circumstances often not conducive to patient compliance. I agree with Dr. Stickler's preference for the use of intramuscularly administered penicillin over orally administered ampicillin (regarding diarrheal complications), and I agree with him that the recommendations of Bass and associates do not follow clearly from their conclusions. However, the methods used by Bass and his colleagues, as well as by Dr. Stickler in a previous study1 both fail to distinguish etiologic agents. Nilson and co-workers2 studied 306 children with acute otitis media and compared penicillin phenoxymethyl, penicillin plus sulfisoxazoles, and ampicillin trihydrate. References 1. Stickler, et al: Treatment of acute otitis media in children . Am J Dis Child 114:123-130, 1967.Crossref 2. Nilson, et al: Acute otitis media: Treatment results in relation to bacterial etiology . Pediatrics 43:351-358, 1969. 3. Charney E: Patient-doctor communication: Implications for the clinician . Pediatr Clin North Am 19:263-279, 1972.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1973

References