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Aminocaproic Acid

Aminocaproic Acid Abstract To the Editor. —We discussed with much interest the article entitled "Aminocaproic Acid Decreases Secondary Hemorrhage After Traumatic Hyphema" by McGetrick et al1 in our monthly journal club. The results of the study, although impressive, raised a number of questions that the article did not address.First, we were curious as to why 46 of the 49 patients in this 1½-year study had manifesting hyphemas filling less than 25% of the anterior chamber. Did most of the patients with hyphemas filling greater than 25% of the anterior chamber "require immediate surgical intervention"? In view of this select population, is it correct to extrapolate the effects of the aminocaproic acid to hyphemas greater than 25% as McGetrick et al did when they "strongly suggest that aminocaproic acid be used routinely in the management of nonperforated traumatic hyphemas"? Read2 cautioned that "systemic aminocaproic acid should be used only in hyphemas References 1. McGetrick JJ, Jampol LM, Goldberg MF, et al: Aminocaproic acid decreases secondary hemorrhage after traumatic hyphema . Arch Ophthalmol 1983;101:1031-1033.Crossref 2. Read J: Trauma: Ruptures and bleeding , in Duane TD (ed): Clinical Ophthalmology . Hagerstown, Md; Harper & Row Publishers Inc, 1982, p 9. 3. Crouch ER, Frenkel M: Aminocaproic acid in the treatment of traumatic hyphema . Am J Ophthalmol 1976;81:355-360. 4. Loring MJ: Traumatic hyphema . Am J Ophthalmol 1958;46:873-880. 5. Goldberg M: Antifibrinolytic agents in the management of traumatic hyphema . Arch Ophthalmol 1983;1:1029-1030.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Aminocaproic Acid

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 102 (6) – Jun 1, 1984

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1984.01040030644002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor. —We discussed with much interest the article entitled "Aminocaproic Acid Decreases Secondary Hemorrhage After Traumatic Hyphema" by McGetrick et al1 in our monthly journal club. The results of the study, although impressive, raised a number of questions that the article did not address.First, we were curious as to why 46 of the 49 patients in this 1½-year study had manifesting hyphemas filling less than 25% of the anterior chamber. Did most of the patients with hyphemas filling greater than 25% of the anterior chamber "require immediate surgical intervention"? In view of this select population, is it correct to extrapolate the effects of the aminocaproic acid to hyphemas greater than 25% as McGetrick et al did when they "strongly suggest that aminocaproic acid be used routinely in the management of nonperforated traumatic hyphemas"? Read2 cautioned that "systemic aminocaproic acid should be used only in hyphemas References 1. McGetrick JJ, Jampol LM, Goldberg MF, et al: Aminocaproic acid decreases secondary hemorrhage after traumatic hyphema . Arch Ophthalmol 1983;101:1031-1033.Crossref 2. Read J: Trauma: Ruptures and bleeding , in Duane TD (ed): Clinical Ophthalmology . Hagerstown, Md; Harper & Row Publishers Inc, 1982, p 9. 3. Crouch ER, Frenkel M: Aminocaproic acid in the treatment of traumatic hyphema . Am J Ophthalmol 1976;81:355-360. 4. Loring MJ: Traumatic hyphema . Am J Ophthalmol 1958;46:873-880. 5. Goldberg M: Antifibrinolytic agents in the management of traumatic hyphema . Arch Ophthalmol 1983;1:1029-1030.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1984

References