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AMBULATORY ENCEPHALITIS

AMBULATORY ENCEPHALITIS Abstract The number of patients suffering from encephalitis who come to the outpatient department of a large hospital, is many more than might be suspected, and the ease with which they are overlooked is so great that it is necessary to call attention to them. As a rule, these patients pass unnoticed because of the mildness of the disease, and also because of the time that has elapsed between the beginning of the illness and the presentation to the physician. Very frequently the condition is entirely overlooked and only those on the alert for it, or those with a neurologic training, are able to detect the cranial nerve involvement. During the mild influenza epidemic of this year, I observed a number of such patients. Most of them came to the neurologic dispensary on account of insomnia or peculiar jerkings of the arms. Some of the patients were referred from other departments References 1. Strauss, Israel, and Globus, J. H.: Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 8:124 ( (Aug.) ) 1922. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1924 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6754
DOI
10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02190310070005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The number of patients suffering from encephalitis who come to the outpatient department of a large hospital, is many more than might be suspected, and the ease with which they are overlooked is so great that it is necessary to call attention to them. As a rule, these patients pass unnoticed because of the mildness of the disease, and also because of the time that has elapsed between the beginning of the illness and the presentation to the physician. Very frequently the condition is entirely overlooked and only those on the alert for it, or those with a neurologic training, are able to detect the cranial nerve involvement. During the mild influenza epidemic of this year, I observed a number of such patients. Most of them came to the neurologic dispensary on account of insomnia or peculiar jerkings of the arms. Some of the patients were referred from other departments References 1. Strauss, Israel, and Globus, J. H.: Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 8:124 ( (Aug.) ) 1922.

Journal

Archives of Neurology & PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1924

References