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Alterations in Vascular Volume After Long Bone Fracture

Alterations in Vascular Volume After Long Bone Fracture Abstract Introduction Fracture of a long bone in the dog produces dramatic alterations in the hemodynamics of the injured region. Widespread vasodilation with accompanying increase in blood flow occurs in the fractured limb.4 Associated changes in the general circulation have not been clearly demonstrated.Textbooks of surgery and orthopedic surgery imply that extensive blood loss follows fracture of a long bone.1,2 On the other hand, we have been unable to find documented proof that significant hemorrhage accompanies the usual uncomplicated fracture. The present study was carried out in an effort to estimate, in a reasonably critical fashion, the amount of hemorrhage that accompanies a closed fracture of a long bone. Fracture sites were restricted to areas with relatively little paraskeletal soft tissue, in an effort to separate the effects of skeletal trauma from those of soft tissue injury. The dog rather than the human was employed in this investigation References 1. Counter—Nancy Wood Counter Laboratory Model SC-2L, Scaler-Baird Atomic Model 1030. 2. Watson-Jones, R.: Fractures and Joint Injuries , ed 4, Baltimore: The Williams & Wilkins Company, 1957, p 227. 3. Committee on Trauma, American College of Surgeons: An Outline of the Treatment of Fractures , ed 7, Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders Company, 1960, p 5. 4. Shoemaker, W. C.: Measurement of Rapidly and Slowly Circulating Red Cell Volumes in Hemorrhagic Shock , Amer J Physiol 202:1179-1182, 1962. 5. Wray, J. B., and Spencer, M. P.: The Vasodilatory Response to Skeletal Trauma , Surg Forum 11:444, 1960. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Alterations in Vascular Volume After Long Bone Fracture

Archives of Surgery , Volume 87 (6) – Dec 1, 1963

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1963 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1963.01310180023006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Introduction Fracture of a long bone in the dog produces dramatic alterations in the hemodynamics of the injured region. Widespread vasodilation with accompanying increase in blood flow occurs in the fractured limb.4 Associated changes in the general circulation have not been clearly demonstrated.Textbooks of surgery and orthopedic surgery imply that extensive blood loss follows fracture of a long bone.1,2 On the other hand, we have been unable to find documented proof that significant hemorrhage accompanies the usual uncomplicated fracture. The present study was carried out in an effort to estimate, in a reasonably critical fashion, the amount of hemorrhage that accompanies a closed fracture of a long bone. Fracture sites were restricted to areas with relatively little paraskeletal soft tissue, in an effort to separate the effects of skeletal trauma from those of soft tissue injury. The dog rather than the human was employed in this investigation References 1. Counter—Nancy Wood Counter Laboratory Model SC-2L, Scaler-Baird Atomic Model 1030. 2. Watson-Jones, R.: Fractures and Joint Injuries , ed 4, Baltimore: The Williams & Wilkins Company, 1957, p 227. 3. Committee on Trauma, American College of Surgeons: An Outline of the Treatment of Fractures , ed 7, Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders Company, 1960, p 5. 4. Shoemaker, W. C.: Measurement of Rapidly and Slowly Circulating Red Cell Volumes in Hemorrhagic Shock , Amer J Physiol 202:1179-1182, 1962. 5. Wray, J. B., and Spencer, M. P.: The Vasodilatory Response to Skeletal Trauma , Surg Forum 11:444, 1960.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1963

References

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