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Allergic Skin Disease: A Multidisciplinary Approach

Allergic Skin Disease: A Multidisciplinary Approach The stated aim of this volume is to update the reader on pathophysiology, socioeconomic impact, and "new" treatment approaches for allergic skin diseases. Internationally respected and recognized dermatology and allergy colleagues are the chapter authors. It appears that neither they nor the editors were very thorough in comparing text content for overlap, contradiction, and gaps. The editors divide the book into 3 sections: General Principles, Specific Allergic Skin Diseases, and Management of Allergic Skin Disease. These chapters are thin in some areas and duplicative in others (eg, The Immunology of Allergic Contact Dermatitis, The Evaluation of Allergic Contact Dermatitis). In the Principles/Pathophysiology section, there are solid readable discussions of molecular and cellular mechanisms and UV effects on allergic skin responses. Unfortunately, nothing new was gleaned from a chapter on pathophysiology of pruritus. Among the specific allergic skin diseases summarized, the Latex Allergy and the Food Allergen chapters are articulate and comprehensive. It eludes me, however, why "sensitive skin" is included in this text at all, let alone having 17 pages dedicated to this subject while the clinical aspects of allergic contact dermatitis only garner a few more pages than that. The authors state that "the concept of sensitive skin itself is fraught with ambiguity and inconsistency." As with many texts in these rapidly changing times, some of the material (eg, manufacturers/distributors of patch test supplies) is out-of-date, and some specific statements are confusing: "Allergic contact dermatitis is caused either by irritants or allergens." Since many of these authors are the same ones who write corresponding chapters in major general dermatology textbooks, the detail and covered topics are similar to what are already on our shelves. Of the preface claim to include new treatment approaches, there is not much beyond a mention of tacrolimus that I would consider to be new or clinically useful. Overall, I would place this book in the hands of a primary care physician who wants to brush up, a training clinical fellow in allergy who wants some basic knowledge of skin allergies, or immunologists and pharmaceutical personnel who want to obtain an overview of the complex subject of allergic skin diseases. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Allergic Skin Disease: A Multidisciplinary Approach

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 138 (1) – Jan 1, 2002

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.138.1.133
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The stated aim of this volume is to update the reader on pathophysiology, socioeconomic impact, and "new" treatment approaches for allergic skin diseases. Internationally respected and recognized dermatology and allergy colleagues are the chapter authors. It appears that neither they nor the editors were very thorough in comparing text content for overlap, contradiction, and gaps. The editors divide the book into 3 sections: General Principles, Specific Allergic Skin Diseases, and Management of Allergic Skin Disease. These chapters are thin in some areas and duplicative in others (eg, The Immunology of Allergic Contact Dermatitis, The Evaluation of Allergic Contact Dermatitis). In the Principles/Pathophysiology section, there are solid readable discussions of molecular and cellular mechanisms and UV effects on allergic skin responses. Unfortunately, nothing new was gleaned from a chapter on pathophysiology of pruritus. Among the specific allergic skin diseases summarized, the Latex Allergy and the Food Allergen chapters are articulate and comprehensive. It eludes me, however, why "sensitive skin" is included in this text at all, let alone having 17 pages dedicated to this subject while the clinical aspects of allergic contact dermatitis only garner a few more pages than that. The authors state that "the concept of sensitive skin itself is fraught with ambiguity and inconsistency." As with many texts in these rapidly changing times, some of the material (eg, manufacturers/distributors of patch test supplies) is out-of-date, and some specific statements are confusing: "Allergic contact dermatitis is caused either by irritants or allergens." Since many of these authors are the same ones who write corresponding chapters in major general dermatology textbooks, the detail and covered topics are similar to what are already on our shelves. Of the preface claim to include new treatment approaches, there is not much beyond a mention of tacrolimus that I would consider to be new or clinically useful. Overall, I would place this book in the hands of a primary care physician who wants to brush up, a training clinical fellow in allergy who wants some basic knowledge of skin allergies, or immunologists and pharmaceutical personnel who want to obtain an overview of the complex subject of allergic skin diseases.

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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