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ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES. In this article I shall not touch upon the uses of alcoholic liquors as remedial agents in disease, but consider them solely in their effects upon alimentation. In so doing free use will be made of the researches and opinions of various writers, whose views differ widely, and an effort will be made to sustain a position removed from either extreme, in the belief that in this, as in most disputed matters, the charge of Apollo to his son Phaethon, on his undertaking to drive the chariot of the Sun, was wise, "In medio tutissimus ibis." Liebig, on chemical grounds, regarded alcohol as a respiratory constituent of food, contributing to the production of animal heat by oxydation. Tallemand, Perrin and Duroy, having detected alcohol in the urine, sweat and exhaled breath, concluded that it passes out of the body mostly without chemical change. But Parkes and Count Wollowicz, by means http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.

JAMA , Volume XXX (8) – Feb 19, 1898

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1898 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1898.72440600016002d
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this article I shall not touch upon the uses of alcoholic liquors as remedial agents in disease, but consider them solely in their effects upon alimentation. In so doing free use will be made of the researches and opinions of various writers, whose views differ widely, and an effort will be made to sustain a position removed from either extreme, in the belief that in this, as in most disputed matters, the charge of Apollo to his son Phaethon, on his undertaking to drive the chariot of the Sun, was wise, "In medio tutissimus ibis." Liebig, on chemical grounds, regarded alcohol as a respiratory constituent of food, contributing to the production of animal heat by oxydation. Tallemand, Perrin and Duroy, having detected alcohol in the urine, sweat and exhaled breath, concluded that it passes out of the body mostly without chemical change. But Parkes and Count Wollowicz, by means

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 19, 1898

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