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Air Pollution, Cardiovascular Disease, and Dementia—Reply

Air Pollution, Cardiovascular Disease, and Dementia—Reply Letters domized studies will determine the ideal BP management strat- First, it is not apparent why the authors would assume egy for endovascular therapy. that CVD acts as a mediator, while cardiovascular risk fac- tors (eg, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes) are consid- Mads Rasmussen, MD, PhD ered confounders. Given that these metabolic disorders are Jan B. Valentin, Msc major risk factors of CVD and also associated with air pollu- Claus Z. Simonsen, MD, PhD tion exposure, these cardiovascular risk factors could be exposure-induced mediator-effect confounders. Thus, we Author Affiliations: Department of Anesthesia, Section of Neuroanesthesia, believe that an extended mediation analysis that considers Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark (Rasmussen); Danish Center for multiple mediators would further advance the current state Clinical Health Services Research, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg of knowledge about the pathways from air pollution expo- University, Aalborg, Denmark (Valentin); Department of Neurology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark (Simonsen). sure to dementia. Corresponding Author: Mads Rasmussen, MD, PhD, Department of Second, the restricted cubic spline curves presented by Anesthesia, Section of Neuroanesthesia, Aarhus University Hospital, Palle the authors suggest some nonlinearity in the association Juul-Jensens Boulevard 99, DK-8200 Aarhus, Denmark (mads.rasmussen@ between exposure and outcome, in that the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Neurology American Medical Association

Air Pollution, Cardiovascular Disease, and Dementia—Reply

JAMA Neurology , Volume 77 (12) – Dec 9, 2020

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2020 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6149
eISSN
2168-6157
DOI
10.1001/jamaneurol.2020.4312
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Letters domized studies will determine the ideal BP management strat- First, it is not apparent why the authors would assume egy for endovascular therapy. that CVD acts as a mediator, while cardiovascular risk fac- tors (eg, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes) are consid- Mads Rasmussen, MD, PhD ered confounders. Given that these metabolic disorders are Jan B. Valentin, Msc major risk factors of CVD and also associated with air pollu- Claus Z. Simonsen, MD, PhD tion exposure, these cardiovascular risk factors could be exposure-induced mediator-effect confounders. Thus, we Author Affiliations: Department of Anesthesia, Section of Neuroanesthesia, believe that an extended mediation analysis that considers Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark (Rasmussen); Danish Center for multiple mediators would further advance the current state Clinical Health Services Research, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg of knowledge about the pathways from air pollution expo- University, Aalborg, Denmark (Valentin); Department of Neurology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark (Simonsen). sure to dementia. Corresponding Author: Mads Rasmussen, MD, PhD, Department of Second, the restricted cubic spline curves presented by Anesthesia, Section of Neuroanesthesia, Aarhus University Hospital, Palle the authors suggest some nonlinearity in the association Juul-Jensens Boulevard 99, DK-8200 Aarhus, Denmark (mads.rasmussen@ between exposure and outcome, in that the

Journal

JAMA NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 9, 2020

References