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AIR CURRENTS IN VENTILATION

AIR CURRENTS IN VENTILATION The oppressiveness of an unventilated room is something that is recognized by our sensations. The effects may vary from slight discomfort to actual malaise, all of which proper ventilation aims to avert. There was a time when hygienists were greatly concerned about the chemical composition of the air in relation to health and comfort, when the "badness" of air in ordinary buildings was sought in the form of excessive amounts of carbon dioxid or more poisonous organic respiratory products. One even heard about the fatigue-producing toxins of expired air. Scientific investigation has failed to support such explanations. In considering ventilation, it attaches importance not to the chemical composition of the air but rather to physical properties, temperature, humidity and movements of the surrounding atmosphere. Successful ventilation, a well known British report states,1 depends on the prevention of stagnation of body heat, on the one hand, and of uncomfortable chilling of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

AIR CURRENTS IN VENTILATION

JAMA , Volume 85 (19) – Nov 7, 1925

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1925 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1925.02670190050019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The oppressiveness of an unventilated room is something that is recognized by our sensations. The effects may vary from slight discomfort to actual malaise, all of which proper ventilation aims to avert. There was a time when hygienists were greatly concerned about the chemical composition of the air in relation to health and comfort, when the "badness" of air in ordinary buildings was sought in the form of excessive amounts of carbon dioxid or more poisonous organic respiratory products. One even heard about the fatigue-producing toxins of expired air. Scientific investigation has failed to support such explanations. In considering ventilation, it attaches importance not to the chemical composition of the air but rather to physical properties, temperature, humidity and movements of the surrounding atmosphere. Successful ventilation, a well known British report states,1 depends on the prevention of stagnation of body heat, on the one hand, and of uncomfortable chilling of

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 7, 1925

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