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Aging and HIV-Related Cognitive Loss

Aging and HIV-Related Cognitive Loss VIEWPOINT tion is older than 50 years. It is uncertain whether HIV- Farrah J. Mateen, MD related cognitive disorders predispose individuals to other forms Edward J. Mills, PhD of neurodegenerative disease or stroke. Older age is also as- sociated with higher rates of Alzheimer disease, vascular de- LTHOUGH ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY HAS HAD A MA- mentia, and Parkinson disease–related dementia, as well as jor effect on improving the survival of individu- other factors such as depression, isolation, and certain nutri- als with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), tional deficiencies that can be associated with cognitive defi- Acognitive disorders related to HIV remain an im- cits. Untreated comorbidities that are more common with age, portant burden of disease and disability worldwide. Among such as hypertension and diabetes, as well as medication tox- the more than 30 million adults living with HIV world- icities and polypharmacy, may exacerbate cognitive deficits wide, a substantial proportion is estimated to have some form in individuals with HIV. of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders encompassing Older individuals with HIV and cognitive loss face soci- HIV dementia, mild neurocognitive impairment, and asymp- etal challenges in at least 4 areas. First, the stigma of HIV tomatic neurocognitive impairment. Conservative esti- infection http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Aging and HIV-Related Cognitive Loss

JAMA , Volume 308 (4) – Jul 25, 2012

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2012 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2012.8538
pmid
22820786
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

VIEWPOINT tion is older than 50 years. It is uncertain whether HIV- Farrah J. Mateen, MD related cognitive disorders predispose individuals to other forms Edward J. Mills, PhD of neurodegenerative disease or stroke. Older age is also as- sociated with higher rates of Alzheimer disease, vascular de- LTHOUGH ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY HAS HAD A MA- mentia, and Parkinson disease–related dementia, as well as jor effect on improving the survival of individu- other factors such as depression, isolation, and certain nutri- als with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), tional deficiencies that can be associated with cognitive defi- Acognitive disorders related to HIV remain an im- cits. Untreated comorbidities that are more common with age, portant burden of disease and disability worldwide. Among such as hypertension and diabetes, as well as medication tox- the more than 30 million adults living with HIV world- icities and polypharmacy, may exacerbate cognitive deficits wide, a substantial proportion is estimated to have some form in individuals with HIV. of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders encompassing Older individuals with HIV and cognitive loss face soci- HIV dementia, mild neurocognitive impairment, and asymp- etal challenges in at least 4 areas. First, the stigma of HIV tomatic neurocognitive impairment. Conservative esti- infection

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 25, 2012

References