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Adverse Reactions to Food Can Cause Hyperkinesis-Reply

Adverse Reactions to Food Can Cause Hyperkinesis-Reply This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract In Reply.—Dr Crook's comments get right to the heart of the issues involved in the relationship between diet and behavior. He says, "I freely admit that the conditions of some of my patients who were hyperactive may have improved after dietary manipulation for a variety of reasons...., I make no claim to understand the mechanisms involved." The point is that Dr Feingold does make a claim that the mechanism underlying behavioral change is the body's response to specific food additives. I agree that there is apparently a relationship between diet and behavior. (Dr Conner's studies demonstrate this, for example.) What isn't clear is whether behavioral change is attributable to food additives or other effects such as psychological ones. For the practitioner whose main goal is to improve function, it may not matter whether improvement is a result of one factor or another, as long as the treatment is not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Adverse Reactions to Food Can Cause Hyperkinesis-Reply

Adverse Reactions to Food Can Cause Hyperkinesis-Reply

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract In Reply.—Dr Crook's comments get right to the heart of the issues involved in the relationship between diet and behavior. He says, "I freely admit that the conditions of some of my patients who were hyperactive may have improved after dietary manipulation for a variety of reasons...., I make no claim to understand the mechanisms...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1978 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1978.02120330091027
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract In Reply.—Dr Crook's comments get right to the heart of the issues involved in the relationship between diet and behavior. He says, "I freely admit that the conditions of some of my patients who were hyperactive may have improved after dietary manipulation for a variety of reasons...., I make no claim to understand the mechanisms involved." The point is that Dr Feingold does make a claim that the mechanism underlying behavioral change is the body's response to specific food additives. I agree that there is apparently a relationship between diet and behavior. (Dr Conner's studies demonstrate this, for example.) What isn't clear is whether behavioral change is attributable to food additives or other effects such as psychological ones. For the practitioner whose main goal is to improve function, it may not matter whether improvement is a result of one factor or another, as long as the treatment is not

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1978

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