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Adverse Effects of Topical Antiglaucoma Medication

Adverse Effects of Topical Antiglaucoma Medication Abstract In their excellent article, Broadway and colleagues1 follow an established convention in defining surgical success in trabeculectomy as an intraocular pressure (IOP) of 21 mm Hg or less without medication. The aim of glaucoma surgery is to reduce IOP to a level where there is nonprogression of visual field loss. The IOP likely to achieve that aim is unknown, but a value of less than 15 mm Hg has been suggested by Hitchings.2 Field stability is found when the IOP is below 17 mm Hg,3 with 58% of fields stable in eyes with pressures below 15 mm Hg compared with only 15% of eyes with pressures above 15 mm Hg.4 However, the matter may not be quite this clear-cut, as a 20-year follow-up of trabeculectomy in a stable, white population in England was unable to demonstrate field stability "... whatever cut off point is used for IOP." References 1. Broadway DC, Grierson I, O'Brien C, Hitchings RA. Adverse effects of topical antiglaucoma medication, 11: the outcome of filtration surgery . Arch Ophthalmol . 1994;112:1446-1453.Crossref 2. Hitchings R. Primary surgery for open angle glaucoma . Eye . 1993;77:445-448. 3. Freyler H, Menapace R. Is blindness inevitable in glaucoma? Spektrum Augenheilkd . 1988;23:121-127. 4. Odberg T. Visual field prognosis in advanced glaucoma . Acta Ophthalmol . 1987;65( (suppl) ):27-29.Crossref 5. Watson PG, Jakeman C, Ozturk M, Barnett MF, Barnett F, Khaw KT. The complications of trabeculectomy (a twenty-year follow-up) . Eye . 1990;4:425-438.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Adverse Effects of Topical Antiglaucoma Medication

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 113 (7) – Jul 1, 1995

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1995.01100070019006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In their excellent article, Broadway and colleagues1 follow an established convention in defining surgical success in trabeculectomy as an intraocular pressure (IOP) of 21 mm Hg or less without medication. The aim of glaucoma surgery is to reduce IOP to a level where there is nonprogression of visual field loss. The IOP likely to achieve that aim is unknown, but a value of less than 15 mm Hg has been suggested by Hitchings.2 Field stability is found when the IOP is below 17 mm Hg,3 with 58% of fields stable in eyes with pressures below 15 mm Hg compared with only 15% of eyes with pressures above 15 mm Hg.4 However, the matter may not be quite this clear-cut, as a 20-year follow-up of trabeculectomy in a stable, white population in England was unable to demonstrate field stability "... whatever cut off point is used for IOP." References 1. Broadway DC, Grierson I, O'Brien C, Hitchings RA. Adverse effects of topical antiglaucoma medication, 11: the outcome of filtration surgery . Arch Ophthalmol . 1994;112:1446-1453.Crossref 2. Hitchings R. Primary surgery for open angle glaucoma . Eye . 1993;77:445-448. 3. Freyler H, Menapace R. Is blindness inevitable in glaucoma? Spektrum Augenheilkd . 1988;23:121-127. 4. Odberg T. Visual field prognosis in advanced glaucoma . Acta Ophthalmol . 1987;65( (suppl) ):27-29.Crossref 5. Watson PG, Jakeman C, Ozturk M, Barnett MF, Barnett F, Khaw KT. The complications of trabeculectomy (a twenty-year follow-up) . Eye . 1990;4:425-438.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1995

References

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