Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Adverse Cardiovascular Outcomes for Women—Biology, Bias, or Both?

Adverse Cardiovascular Outcomes for Women—Biology, Bias, or Both? Opinion EDITORIAL Nanette K. Wenger, MD, MACC, MACP In this issue of JAMA Cardiology,Jietal identify that starting sive treatment, and offsets women’s lower cardiovascular risk. at an early age, women have steeper increases in blood pres- Obesity, arterial stiffness, and inflammation are important sure than men throughout life, setting the stage for cardiovas- modulators. cular disease presenting differently, not simply later, in women With the earlier and steeper blood pressure trajectory in than men. This introduces the women, are women more likely to have uncontrolled hyper- concept that biology serves tension and its adverse consequences than men? Hyperten- Author Audio Interview as an underpinning of sex sion is the predominant diagnosis for ambulatory care visits differences in the pathophysi- for women. Yet, compared with men, women remain under- Related article page 255 ology of cardiovascular ill- treated to goal, such that treated vs untreated analyses re- nesses, in subsequent dis- main flawed. Again, contemporary data suggest that drug dos- tinct pathophysiologic alterations, and in the variability in ages may differ between the sexes, with unknown associations treatment effectiveness. The authors view blood pressure as with hypertensive therapy adherence and blood pressure con- the single most accessible metric of vascular http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Cardiology American Medical Association

Adverse Cardiovascular Outcomes for Women—Biology, Bias, or Both?

JAMA Cardiology , Volume 5 (3) – Mar 15, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/adverse-cardiovascular-outcomes-for-women-biology-bias-or-both-JYEls41rw0
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2020 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2380-6583
eISSN
2380-6591
DOI
10.1001/jamacardio.2019.5576
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Nanette K. Wenger, MD, MACC, MACP In this issue of JAMA Cardiology,Jietal identify that starting sive treatment, and offsets women’s lower cardiovascular risk. at an early age, women have steeper increases in blood pres- Obesity, arterial stiffness, and inflammation are important sure than men throughout life, setting the stage for cardiovas- modulators. cular disease presenting differently, not simply later, in women With the earlier and steeper blood pressure trajectory in than men. This introduces the women, are women more likely to have uncontrolled hyper- concept that biology serves tension and its adverse consequences than men? Hyperten- Author Audio Interview as an underpinning of sex sion is the predominant diagnosis for ambulatory care visits differences in the pathophysi- for women. Yet, compared with men, women remain under- Related article page 255 ology of cardiovascular ill- treated to goal, such that treated vs untreated analyses re- nesses, in subsequent dis- main flawed. Again, contemporary data suggest that drug dos- tinct pathophysiologic alterations, and in the variability in ages may differ between the sexes, with unknown associations treatment effectiveness. The authors view blood pressure as with hypertensive therapy adherence and blood pressure con- the single most accessible metric of vascular

Journal

JAMA CardiologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 15, 2020

References