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Adjustable Suture Technique for Levator Recession

Adjustable Suture Technique for Levator Recession Abstract In the article titled "Adjustable Suture Technique for Levator Recession" by Woog et al,1 the authors conclude that adjustable sutures may be a useful adjunct in levator recession surgery based on their experience with 10 patients, 1 of whom required a postoperative suture adjustment. In 1982 I dubbed adjustable sutures in levator aponeurosis recessions "trombone sutures"2 because of the ease with which I thought I could move the eyelid up and down with adjustable sutures after surgery. My initial enthusiasm has lessened. In 1995 I reviewed 181 eyelid recessions.3 Twenty-two percent (32%) of 68 eyelids recessed with adjustable sutures in the levator aponeurosis required reoperation compared with 4 (12%) of 33 eyelids recessed without adjustable sutures. In 62 eyelids recessed by the pre-Whitnall technique, all had adjustable sutures and 13 (21%) required reoperation. In the pre-Whitnall technique the muscle is recessed high in the orbit above the References 1. Woog JJ, Hartstein ME, Hoenig J. Adjustable suture technique for levator recession . Arch Ophthalmol . 1996;114:620-624.Crossref 2. Small, RG. Controlled recession of the upper eyelid . Adv Ophthalmic Plast Recontr Surg . 1982;1:263-274. 3. Small, RG. Surgery for upper eyelid retraction, three techniques . Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc . 1995;93:353-369. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Adjustable Suture Technique for Levator Recession

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 115 (2) – Feb 1, 1997

Adjustable Suture Technique for Levator Recession

Abstract

Abstract In the article titled "Adjustable Suture Technique for Levator Recession" by Woog et al,1 the authors conclude that adjustable sutures may be a useful adjunct in levator recession surgery based on their experience with 10 patients, 1 of whom required a postoperative suture adjustment. In 1982 I dubbed adjustable sutures in levator aponeurosis recessions "trombone sutures"2 because of the ease with which I thought I could move the eyelid up and down with adjustable...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1997.01100150297038
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In the article titled "Adjustable Suture Technique for Levator Recession" by Woog et al,1 the authors conclude that adjustable sutures may be a useful adjunct in levator recession surgery based on their experience with 10 patients, 1 of whom required a postoperative suture adjustment. In 1982 I dubbed adjustable sutures in levator aponeurosis recessions "trombone sutures"2 because of the ease with which I thought I could move the eyelid up and down with adjustable sutures after surgery. My initial enthusiasm has lessened. In 1995 I reviewed 181 eyelid recessions.3 Twenty-two percent (32%) of 68 eyelids recessed with adjustable sutures in the levator aponeurosis required reoperation compared with 4 (12%) of 33 eyelids recessed without adjustable sutures. In 62 eyelids recessed by the pre-Whitnall technique, all had adjustable sutures and 13 (21%) required reoperation. In the pre-Whitnall technique the muscle is recessed high in the orbit above the References 1. Woog JJ, Hartstein ME, Hoenig J. Adjustable suture technique for levator recession . Arch Ophthalmol . 1996;114:620-624.Crossref 2. Small, RG. Controlled recession of the upper eyelid . Adv Ophthalmic Plast Recontr Surg . 1982;1:263-274. 3. Small, RG. Surgery for upper eyelid retraction, three techniques . Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc . 1995;93:353-369.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1997

References