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Adherence to Colorectal Cancer Screening

Adherence to Colorectal Cancer Screening ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION A Randomized Clinical Trial of Competing Strategies John M. Inadomi, MD; Sandeep Vijan, MD, MS; Nancy K. Janz, PhD; Angela Fagerlin, PhD; Jennifer P. Thomas, BS; Yunghui V. Lin, RN, MA; Roxana Mun˜oz; Chim Lau, BA; Ma Somsouk, MD, MAS; Najwa El-Nachef, MD; Rodney A. Hayward, MD Background: Despite evidence that several colorectal nificantly lower rate (38%) than participants who were cancer (CRC) screening strategies can reduce CRC mor- recommended FOBT (67%) (P.001) or given a choice tality, screening rates remain low. This study aimed to between FOBT or colonoscopy (69%) (P.001). Lati- determine whether the approach by which screening is nos and Asians (primarily Chinese) completed screen- recommended influences adherence. ing more often than African Americans. Moreover, non- white participants adhered more often to FOBT, while Methods: We used a cluster randomization design with white participants adhered more often to colonoscopy. clinic time block as the unit of randomization. Persons at average risk for development of CRC in a racially/ Conclusions: The common practice of universally rec- ethnically diverse urban setting were randomized to re- ommending colonoscopy may reduce adherence to ceive recommendation for screening by fecal occult blood CRC screening, especially among racial/ethnic minori- testing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2012 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/archinternmed.2012.332
pmid
22493463
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION A Randomized Clinical Trial of Competing Strategies John M. Inadomi, MD; Sandeep Vijan, MD, MS; Nancy K. Janz, PhD; Angela Fagerlin, PhD; Jennifer P. Thomas, BS; Yunghui V. Lin, RN, MA; Roxana Mun˜oz; Chim Lau, BA; Ma Somsouk, MD, MAS; Najwa El-Nachef, MD; Rodney A. Hayward, MD Background: Despite evidence that several colorectal nificantly lower rate (38%) than participants who were cancer (CRC) screening strategies can reduce CRC mor- recommended FOBT (67%) (P.001) or given a choice tality, screening rates remain low. This study aimed to between FOBT or colonoscopy (69%) (P.001). Lati- determine whether the approach by which screening is nos and Asians (primarily Chinese) completed screen- recommended influences adherence. ing more often than African Americans. Moreover, non- white participants adhered more often to FOBT, while Methods: We used a cluster randomization design with white participants adhered more often to colonoscopy. clinic time block as the unit of randomization. Persons at average risk for development of CRC in a racially/ Conclusions: The common practice of universally rec- ethnically diverse urban setting were randomized to re- ommending colonoscopy may reduce adherence to ceive recommendation for screening by fecal occult blood CRC screening, especially among racial/ethnic minori- testing

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 9, 2012

References