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Addressing Disparities in Academic Medicine

Addressing Disparities in Academic Medicine Editorial Opinion nism by which outdoor activities may provide a benefit in re- gression by those same activities is difficult to ignore. Al- ducing myopia so the intervention can be precisely designed. though prescribing this approach with the intent of helping to Given the popular appeal of increased outdoor activities prevent myopia would appear to have no risk, parents should to improve the health of school-aged children in general, the understand that the magnitude of the effect is likely to be small potential benefit of slowing myopia development and pro- and the durability is uncertain. ARTICLE INFORMATION children: Multi-Ethnic Pediatric Eye Disease Study. among children in China: a randomized clinical trial. Ophthalmology. 2013;120(10):2109-2116. JAMA. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.10803. Author Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. 5. Vitale S, Sperduto RD, Ferris FL III. Increased 14. Zadnik K, Sinnott LT, Cotter SA, et al; prevalence of myopia in the United States between Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity Corresponding Author: Michael X. Repka, MD, 1971-1972 and 1999-2004. Arch Ophthalmol. 2009; and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study Group. MBA, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 127(12):1632-1639. Prediction of juvenile-onset myopia. JAMA 600 N Wolfe St, Baltimore, MD 21287 Ophthalmol. 2015;133(6):683-689. (mrepka@jhmi.edu). 6. Foster http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Addressing Disparities in Academic Medicine

JAMA , Volume 314 (11) – Sep 15, 2015

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2015 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2015.10664
pmid
26372582
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editorial Opinion nism by which outdoor activities may provide a benefit in re- gression by those same activities is difficult to ignore. Al- ducing myopia so the intervention can be precisely designed. though prescribing this approach with the intent of helping to Given the popular appeal of increased outdoor activities prevent myopia would appear to have no risk, parents should to improve the health of school-aged children in general, the understand that the magnitude of the effect is likely to be small potential benefit of slowing myopia development and pro- and the durability is uncertain. ARTICLE INFORMATION children: Multi-Ethnic Pediatric Eye Disease Study. among children in China: a randomized clinical trial. Ophthalmology. 2013;120(10):2109-2116. JAMA. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.10803. Author Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. 5. Vitale S, Sperduto RD, Ferris FL III. Increased 14. Zadnik K, Sinnott LT, Cotter SA, et al; prevalence of myopia in the United States between Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity Corresponding Author: Michael X. Repka, MD, 1971-1972 and 1999-2004. Arch Ophthalmol. 2009; and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study Group. MBA, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 127(12):1632-1639. Prediction of juvenile-onset myopia. JAMA 600 N Wolfe St, Baltimore, MD 21287 Ophthalmol. 2015;133(6):683-689. (mrepka@jhmi.edu). 6. Foster

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 15, 2015

References