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Addressing Challenges and Implications of National Surveillance for Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Diabetes

Addressing Challenges and Implications of National Surveillance for Racial/Ethnic Disparities in... Opinion EDITORIAL Addressing Challenges and Implications of National Surveillance for Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Diabetes Kunihiro Matsushita, MD, PhD; Olive Tang, AB; Elizabeth Selvin, PhD, MPH Diabetes mellitus is an epidemic in the United States that dis- highest fasting plasma glucose level, and Asian groups had the proportionately affects racial/ethnic minorities, with higher highest 2-hour plasma glucose level. Whether these differ- ences reflect variations in underlying biology or in test per- prevalence in black, Hispanic, and Asian populations than in the white population. Racial/ethnic minorities with diabetes formance by race and ethnicity is not known. also have worse outcomes, including higher risks of amputa- The high prevalence of prediabetes documented by Cheng 2 3 tions, end-stage kidney disease, and death. et al (approximately 30%-40%) is concerning but also requires In this issue of JAMA, Cheng and colleagues used 2011- context. Several definitions of prediabetes are currently in clini- 2016 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examina- cal use, and depending on the definition used, prevalence esti- tion Survey (NHANES) to estimate the race/ethnicity–specific mates for prediabetes identified using a single test can differ by 8 3 prevalence of diabetes in the United States. In this analysis of up to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Addressing Challenges and Implications of National Surveillance for Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Diabetes

JAMA , Volume 322 (24) – Dec 24, 2019

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2019 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2019.19428
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Addressing Challenges and Implications of National Surveillance for Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Diabetes Kunihiro Matsushita, MD, PhD; Olive Tang, AB; Elizabeth Selvin, PhD, MPH Diabetes mellitus is an epidemic in the United States that dis- highest fasting plasma glucose level, and Asian groups had the proportionately affects racial/ethnic minorities, with higher highest 2-hour plasma glucose level. Whether these differ- ences reflect variations in underlying biology or in test per- prevalence in black, Hispanic, and Asian populations than in the white population. Racial/ethnic minorities with diabetes formance by race and ethnicity is not known. also have worse outcomes, including higher risks of amputa- The high prevalence of prediabetes documented by Cheng 2 3 tions, end-stage kidney disease, and death. et al (approximately 30%-40%) is concerning but also requires In this issue of JAMA, Cheng and colleagues used 2011- context. Several definitions of prediabetes are currently in clini- 2016 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examina- cal use, and depending on the definition used, prevalence esti- tion Survey (NHANES) to estimate the race/ethnicity–specific mates for prediabetes identified using a single test can differ by 8 3 prevalence of diabetes in the United States. In this analysis of up to

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 24, 2019

References