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Additional Ways to Diminish the Deleterious Effects of Red Meat—Reply

Additional Ways to Diminish the Deleterious Effects of Red Meat—Reply In reply We thank Dr Gorelik and colleagues for their suggestion to use red wine to diminish the deleterious effects of red meat. Their experimental studies in rats1 and a small dietary study in 10 healthy adults2 indicated that red meat consumption promoted lipid peroxidation and increased the postprandial plasma malondialdehyde level, while the coconsumption of red wine concentrate, which is rich in polyphenols, with red meat significantly reduced the stomach oxidation process of the meat products and prevented the absorption of meat-derived aldehydes in the plasma. Although this interaction is theoretically possible, there are no data on the health effects of combining red meat with red wine or polyphenols on long-term disease outcomes. In our analysis,3 we carefully controlled for alcohol consumption in the models. The results were not altered when adjusting for specific types of alcohol drinks (red wine, white wine, beer, or liquor). In addition, we did not find a significant interaction between red meat consumption and alcohol intake (all types of alcohol and wine specifically) with regard to risk of all-cause mortality. The positive association between red meat consumption and risk of all-cause mortality was similar between regular wine drinkers (≥3 servings per week) and nondrinkers. Therefore, our data suggest that the detrimental effects of red meat are likely to be independent of alcohol consumption. In our study, replacement of red meat by healthy sources of protein such as fish, poultry, nuts, legumes, low-fat dairy, and whole grains was associated with significant reductions in mortality risk. Therefore, pairing wine with foods other than red meat (eg, red wine with nut loaf or white wine with fish or roasted chicken) is a healthier food choice and combination. Back to top Article Information Correspondence: Dr Hu, Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 (frank.hu@channing.harvard.edu). Financial Disclosure: None reported. References 1. Gorelik S, Ligumsky M, Kohen R, Kanner J. The stomach as a “bioreactor”: when red meat meets red wine. J Agric Food Chem. 2008;56(13):5002-500718540628PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 2. Gorelik S, Ligumsky M, Kohen R, Kanner J. A novel function of red wine polyphenols in humans: prevention of absorption of cytotoxic lipid peroxidation products. FASEB J. 2008;22(1):41-4617712060PubMedGoogle Scholar 3. Pan A, Sun Q, Bernstein AM, et al. Red meat consumption and mortality: results from 2 prospective cohort studies. Arch Intern Med. 2012;172(7):555-56322412075PubMedGoogle Scholar http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Additional Ways to Diminish the Deleterious Effects of Red Meat—Reply

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinternmed.2012.4111
Publisher site
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Abstract

In reply We thank Dr Gorelik and colleagues for their suggestion to use red wine to diminish the deleterious effects of red meat. Their experimental studies in rats1 and a small dietary study in 10 healthy adults2 indicated that red meat consumption promoted lipid peroxidation and increased the postprandial plasma malondialdehyde level, while the coconsumption of red wine concentrate, which is rich in polyphenols, with red meat significantly reduced the stomach oxidation process of the meat products and prevented the absorption of meat-derived aldehydes in the plasma. Although this interaction is theoretically possible, there are no data on the health effects of combining red meat with red wine or polyphenols on long-term disease outcomes. In our analysis,3 we carefully controlled for alcohol consumption in the models. The results were not altered when adjusting for specific types of alcohol drinks (red wine, white wine, beer, or liquor). In addition, we did not find a significant interaction between red meat consumption and alcohol intake (all types of alcohol and wine specifically) with regard to risk of all-cause mortality. The positive association between red meat consumption and risk of all-cause mortality was similar between regular wine drinkers (≥3 servings per week) and nondrinkers. Therefore, our data suggest that the detrimental effects of red meat are likely to be independent of alcohol consumption. In our study, replacement of red meat by healthy sources of protein such as fish, poultry, nuts, legumes, low-fat dairy, and whole grains was associated with significant reductions in mortality risk. Therefore, pairing wine with foods other than red meat (eg, red wine with nut loaf or white wine with fish or roasted chicken) is a healthier food choice and combination. Back to top Article Information Correspondence: Dr Hu, Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 (frank.hu@channing.harvard.edu). Financial Disclosure: None reported. References 1. Gorelik S, Ligumsky M, Kohen R, Kanner J. The stomach as a “bioreactor”: when red meat meets red wine. J Agric Food Chem. 2008;56(13):5002-500718540628PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 2. Gorelik S, Ligumsky M, Kohen R, Kanner J. A novel function of red wine polyphenols in humans: prevention of absorption of cytotoxic lipid peroxidation products. FASEB J. 2008;22(1):41-4617712060PubMedGoogle Scholar 3. Pan A, Sun Q, Bernstein AM, et al. Red meat consumption and mortality: results from 2 prospective cohort studies. Arch Intern Med. 2012;172(7):555-56322412075PubMedGoogle Scholar

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 8, 2012

Keywords: red meat

References