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Acute Treatment for Migraine

Acute Treatment for Migraine Opinion EDITORIAL Contemporary Treatments and Future Directions Rebecca Burch, MD; Melissa Rayhill, MD Acute treatment for migraine, also called abortive or sympto- both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions such matic treatment, is used at the time of a migraine attack with as devices. The largest evidence base was for triptans, nonsteroi- dal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (diclofenac, aspirin, ibu- the aim of relieving both pain and the associated symptoms of migraine such as photophobia, phonophobia, and nausea. profen, and ketorolac), and combinations of these agents; given Available data and expert con- the large number of trials, the authors focused on summarizing sensus agree that acute treat- 15 published systematic reviews of these treatments. Their sys- Related articles pages 2348 and 2357 ment should be reliably and tematic review of other acute migraine interventions identified quickly effective, have a low incidence of symptom recur- 115 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) from 121 articles with 28 803 rence, be safe and free from bothersome adverse effects that ne- patients. The authors found high strength of evidence for use gate the functional benefits of treatment, and be accessible and of triptans and moderate strength of evidence for NSAIDs for the 1,2 affordable. Despite the availability http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Acute Treatment for Migraine

JAMA , Volume 325 (23) – Jun 15, 2021

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2021 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2021.7275
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Contemporary Treatments and Future Directions Rebecca Burch, MD; Melissa Rayhill, MD Acute treatment for migraine, also called abortive or sympto- both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions such matic treatment, is used at the time of a migraine attack with as devices. The largest evidence base was for triptans, nonsteroi- dal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (diclofenac, aspirin, ibu- the aim of relieving both pain and the associated symptoms of migraine such as photophobia, phonophobia, and nausea. profen, and ketorolac), and combinations of these agents; given Available data and expert con- the large number of trials, the authors focused on summarizing sensus agree that acute treat- 15 published systematic reviews of these treatments. Their sys- Related articles pages 2348 and 2357 ment should be reliably and tematic review of other acute migraine interventions identified quickly effective, have a low incidence of symptom recur- 115 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) from 121 articles with 28 803 rence, be safe and free from bothersome adverse effects that ne- patients. The authors found high strength of evidence for use gate the functional benefits of treatment, and be accessible and of triptans and moderate strength of evidence for NSAIDs for the 1,2 affordable. Despite the availability

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 15, 2021

References