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Acute Renal Failure-Reply

Acute Renal Failure-Reply Abstract In Reply.— We agree with Dr. Colley's view that excessive amounts of contrast medium are implicated in the toxicity we report, and we concur that in selected cases, in the hands of an experienced operator, that direct carotid or brachial artery studies may be preferable to prolonged femoral catheterizations.However, he may be oversimplifying the clinical situation. The precise dosage at which one should abandon the femoral approach and attempt a more direct route is not as clear as suggested by Dr Colley. Many neuroradiologists in present practice recommend the femoral route initially, especially in elderly patients with suggested vascular disease1 to avoid the complications of direct carotid puncture.2.3 To study angiographically both common carotid arteries, a vertebral artery, and the aortic arch in two projections requires at least 160 ml of contrast material for the filming sequences alone, an amount exceeding that used in one of our reported cases. References 1. Newton TH, Kerber CW: Techniques of catheter cerebral angiography , in Newton TH, Potts DG, (eds): Radiology of the Skull and Brain . St Louis, CV Mosby Co, 1974. 2. Allen JH, Parera C, Potts DG: The relation of arterial trauma to complications of cerebral angiography . Am J Roentgenol Radium Ther Nucl Med 95:845-851, 1965.Crossref 3. Vitek JJ: Microaneurysms of the carotid artery after "non-traumatic" percutaneous puncture . Radiology 106:101-104, 1973.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

Acute Renal Failure-Reply

Archives of Neurology , Volume 34 (2) – Feb 1, 1977

Acute Renal Failure-Reply

Abstract

Abstract In Reply.— We agree with Dr. Colley's view that excessive amounts of contrast medium are implicated in the toxicity we report, and we concur that in selected cases, in the hands of an experienced operator, that direct carotid or brachial artery studies may be preferable to prolonged femoral catheterizations.However, he may be oversimplifying the clinical situation. The precise dosage at which one should abandon the femoral approach and attempt a more direct route is not as...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1977 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneur.1977.00500140087025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In Reply.— We agree with Dr. Colley's view that excessive amounts of contrast medium are implicated in the toxicity we report, and we concur that in selected cases, in the hands of an experienced operator, that direct carotid or brachial artery studies may be preferable to prolonged femoral catheterizations.However, he may be oversimplifying the clinical situation. The precise dosage at which one should abandon the femoral approach and attempt a more direct route is not as clear as suggested by Dr Colley. Many neuroradiologists in present practice recommend the femoral route initially, especially in elderly patients with suggested vascular disease1 to avoid the complications of direct carotid puncture.2.3 To study angiographically both common carotid arteries, a vertebral artery, and the aortic arch in two projections requires at least 160 ml of contrast material for the filming sequences alone, an amount exceeding that used in one of our reported cases. References 1. Newton TH, Kerber CW: Techniques of catheter cerebral angiography , in Newton TH, Potts DG, (eds): Radiology of the Skull and Brain . St Louis, CV Mosby Co, 1974. 2. Allen JH, Parera C, Potts DG: The relation of arterial trauma to complications of cerebral angiography . Am J Roentgenol Radium Ther Nucl Med 95:845-851, 1965.Crossref 3. Vitek JJ: Microaneurysms of the carotid artery after "non-traumatic" percutaneous puncture . Radiology 106:101-104, 1973.Crossref

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1977

References