Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Active Surveillance for Black Men With Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

Active Surveillance for Black Men With Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Opinion EDITORIAL Xinglei Shen, MD, MS; Curtis A. Pettaway, MD; Ronald C. Chen, MD, MPH Overtreatment of patients with early-stage prostate cancer is this underutilization of active surveillance among Black men 1,2 a widely recognized clinical problem. Most patients with low- is appropriate or represents another form of care disparity given risk prostate cancer (defined as prostate-specific antigen [PSA] the potential benefits of active surveillance in reducing harms from overtreatment. level ≤10 ng/mL, biopsy Gleason score 6, and clinical stage T1c or T2a by the National Com- In this issue of JAMA, Deka et al report a retrospective co- prehensive Cancer Network hortanalysisof2280Blackpatientsand6446Whitepatientswith Related article page 1747 guidelines) do not benefit low-risk prostate cancer who underwent active surveillance in from immediate aggressive treatment in terms of lengthen- the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Health Care System. ing survival. Patients may be harmed by surgical or radiation In this study, at 10 years, higher rates of disease progression treatments that lead to negative short-term and long-term ef- (59.9% vs 48.3%) and definitive treatment (54.8% vs 41.4%) were fects on quality of life. Overtreatment of early-stage prostate observed among Black patients compared with White patients, cancer is associated with an estimated more http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Active Surveillance for Black Men With Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

JAMA , Volume 324 (17) – Nov 3, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/active-surveillance-for-black-men-with-low-risk-prostate-cancer-bJEq0eYif3
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2020 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2020.16315
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Xinglei Shen, MD, MS; Curtis A. Pettaway, MD; Ronald C. Chen, MD, MPH Overtreatment of patients with early-stage prostate cancer is this underutilization of active surveillance among Black men 1,2 a widely recognized clinical problem. Most patients with low- is appropriate or represents another form of care disparity given risk prostate cancer (defined as prostate-specific antigen [PSA] the potential benefits of active surveillance in reducing harms from overtreatment. level ≤10 ng/mL, biopsy Gleason score 6, and clinical stage T1c or T2a by the National Com- In this issue of JAMA, Deka et al report a retrospective co- prehensive Cancer Network hortanalysisof2280Blackpatientsand6446Whitepatientswith Related article page 1747 guidelines) do not benefit low-risk prostate cancer who underwent active surveillance in from immediate aggressive treatment in terms of lengthen- the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Health Care System. ing survival. Patients may be harmed by surgical or radiation In this study, at 10 years, higher rates of disease progression treatments that lead to negative short-term and long-term ef- (59.9% vs 48.3%) and definitive treatment (54.8% vs 41.4%) were fects on quality of life. Overtreatment of early-stage prostate observed among Black patients compared with White patients, cancer is associated with an estimated more

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 3, 2020

References