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Active Commuting to School and Cognitive Performance in Adolescents

Active Commuting to School and Cognitive Performance in Adolescents ARTICLE ONLINE FIRST Active Commuting to School and Cognitive Performance in Adolescents The AVENA Study David Martı´nez-Go´mez, MSc; Jonatan R. Ruiz, PhD; Sonia Go´mez-Martı´nez, PhD; Palma Chillo´n, PhD; J. Pablo Rey-Lo´pez, MSc; Ligia E. Dı´az, PhD; Ruth Castillo, PhD; Oscar L. Veiga, PhD; Ascension Marcos, PhD; for the AVENA Study Group Objective: To examine the associations between ac- Results: Active commuting to school was associated with tive commuting to school and cognitive performance in better cognitive performance (all P .05) in girls but not adolescents. in boys, independent of potential confounders includ- ing participation in extracurricular physical activity. In Design: Cross-sectional study. addition, adolescent girls who spent more than 15 min- utes actively commuting to school had better scores in 3 Setting: Five cities (Granada, Madrid, Murcia, Santander, of the 4 cognitive performance variables (all P .05) than and Zaragoza) in Spain. those who spent less time actively commuting to school (15 minutes) as well as better scores in all of the cog- Participants: A total of 1700 adolescents (892 girls) aged nitive performance variables (all P .001) than girls in- 13 to 18.5 years. actively commuting. Main Exposures: Mode and duration of transporta- Conclusion: Active commuting to school http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2011 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.244
pmid
21135316
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ARTICLE ONLINE FIRST Active Commuting to School and Cognitive Performance in Adolescents The AVENA Study David Martı´nez-Go´mez, MSc; Jonatan R. Ruiz, PhD; Sonia Go´mez-Martı´nez, PhD; Palma Chillo´n, PhD; J. Pablo Rey-Lo´pez, MSc; Ligia E. Dı´az, PhD; Ruth Castillo, PhD; Oscar L. Veiga, PhD; Ascension Marcos, PhD; for the AVENA Study Group Objective: To examine the associations between ac- Results: Active commuting to school was associated with tive commuting to school and cognitive performance in better cognitive performance (all P .05) in girls but not adolescents. in boys, independent of potential confounders includ- ing participation in extracurricular physical activity. In Design: Cross-sectional study. addition, adolescent girls who spent more than 15 min- utes actively commuting to school had better scores in 3 Setting: Five cities (Granada, Madrid, Murcia, Santander, of the 4 cognitive performance variables (all P .05) than and Zaragoza) in Spain. those who spent less time actively commuting to school (15 minutes) as well as better scores in all of the cog- Participants: A total of 1700 adolescents (892 girls) aged nitive performance variables (all P .001) than girls in- 13 to 18.5 years. actively commuting. Main Exposures: Mode and duration of transporta- Conclusion: Active commuting to school

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 2011

References