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ACROCEPHALY

ACROCEPHALY Acrocephaly, or tower head, is the term applied to that syndrome consisting of a dome-shaped skull, with characteristic Roentgen-ray findings, exophthalmos and optic nerve changes, associated with some minor abnormalities, such as a high, arched palate and deformities of the hands or feet. Acrocephaly is synonymous with thurmschädel, Spitzkopf, steeple head, turret skull, turritum caput, tête à la thersite. When combined with deformities of the hands or feet the name acrocephalosyndactilysm is applied. Previous to 1911 Fletcher1 found there had been reported between eighty and ninety cases. Von Graefe2 in 1866 first definitely recognized and described the condition. Since then Michel,3 J. Hirschberg,4 Enslin,5 Patry6 and others have reported cases. The etiology is obscure. The most probable cause is a premature ossification of the cranial sutures, but the underlying cause is unknown. There is not even a good theory. Syphilis does not seem to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1917 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1917.01910010070005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Acrocephaly, or tower head, is the term applied to that syndrome consisting of a dome-shaped skull, with characteristic Roentgen-ray findings, exophthalmos and optic nerve changes, associated with some minor abnormalities, such as a high, arched palate and deformities of the hands or feet. Acrocephaly is synonymous with thurmschädel, Spitzkopf, steeple head, turret skull, turritum caput, tête à la thersite. When combined with deformities of the hands or feet the name acrocephalosyndactilysm is applied. Previous to 1911 Fletcher1 found there had been reported between eighty and ninety cases. Von Graefe2 in 1866 first definitely recognized and described the condition. Since then Michel,3 J. Hirschberg,4 Enslin,5 Patry6 and others have reported cases. The etiology is obscure. The most probable cause is a premature ossification of the cranial sutures, but the underlying cause is unknown. There is not even a good theory. Syphilis does not seem to

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1917

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