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Acquired Hypertrichosis Singularis

Acquired Hypertrichosis Singularis Abstract We observed a young man having a single, rapidly growing, long terminal hair over the right upper eyelash. Local pathologic findings were absent. Report of a Case. A 23-year-old man rushed one morning to our outpatient clinic, concerned about an abnormally growing long white hair with a black terminal end over the right upper eyelash. It took only 5 months to become 7.4 cm long, growing at the rate of 0.04 cm/d (Figure). The shape and texture of the hair was normal. The eyelids, eyelashes, and eyebrows were normal. Findings from the ophthalmologic examination were normal. No other abnormal finding was found on clinical examination. Routine as well as other investigations to rule out any systemic pathologic findings, such as nevi, were normal. The hair is still growing. Comment. Concentric or localized hypertrichosis has been reported in the literature.1-4 There is no report of abnormal color and growth of References 1. GonjalesJJ, Ungaro PC, Hooper JW. Acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa . Arch Intern Med. 1986;140:969-970. 2. Hegedus SI, Schorr WF. Acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa and malignancy . Arch Dermatol. 1970;106:84-88.Crossref 3. Hensley GT, Glynn KP. Hypertrichosis lanuginosa as a sign of internal malignancy . Cancer. 1969;24:1051-1053.Crossref 4. Jemec GBE. Hypertrichosis lanuginosa acquisita: report of a case and review of the literature . Arch Dermatol. 1986;122:805-808.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Acquired Hypertrichosis Singularis

Acquired Hypertrichosis Singularis

Abstract

Abstract We observed a young man having a single, rapidly growing, long terminal hair over the right upper eyelash. Local pathologic findings were absent. Report of a Case. A 23-year-old man rushed one morning to our outpatient clinic, concerned about an abnormally growing long white hair with a black terminal end over the right upper eyelash. It took only 5 months to become 7.4 cm long, growing at the rate of 0.04 cm/d (Figure). The shape and texture of the hair was normal. The eyelids,...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1995.01690170121025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract We observed a young man having a single, rapidly growing, long terminal hair over the right upper eyelash. Local pathologic findings were absent. Report of a Case. A 23-year-old man rushed one morning to our outpatient clinic, concerned about an abnormally growing long white hair with a black terminal end over the right upper eyelash. It took only 5 months to become 7.4 cm long, growing at the rate of 0.04 cm/d (Figure). The shape and texture of the hair was normal. The eyelids, eyelashes, and eyebrows were normal. Findings from the ophthalmologic examination were normal. No other abnormal finding was found on clinical examination. Routine as well as other investigations to rule out any systemic pathologic findings, such as nevi, were normal. The hair is still growing. Comment. Concentric or localized hypertrichosis has been reported in the literature.1-4 There is no report of abnormal color and growth of References 1. GonjalesJJ, Ungaro PC, Hooper JW. Acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa . Arch Intern Med. 1986;140:969-970. 2. Hegedus SI, Schorr WF. Acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa and malignancy . Arch Dermatol. 1970;106:84-88.Crossref 3. Hensley GT, Glynn KP. Hypertrichosis lanuginosa as a sign of internal malignancy . Cancer. 1969;24:1051-1053.Crossref 4. Jemec GBE. Hypertrichosis lanuginosa acquisita: report of a case and review of the literature . Arch Dermatol. 1986;122:805-808.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1995

References