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Acoustic Value of Brain-stem Audiometry in Infancy

Acoustic Value of Brain-stem Audiometry in Infancy This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract At the 1989 meeting of the Triological Society in San Francisco, Calif, Drs Peter W. Alberti, Martyn L. Hyde, and Krista Riko, Toronto, Canada, presented a study regarding the validity of brain-stem audiometry in high-risk infants. The study group consisted of 731 high-risk infants comparing early brain-stem audiometry with results of later behavioral testing done at ages 3 to 5 years. Children were initially selected for evaluation from a high-risk registry and underwent brain-stem electric response audiometry at 3 to 4 months of age. Approximately 5% had moderate-to-severe hearing losses. The infants who had conductive losses due to middle ear effusion were excluded from the study. When a threshold for sensorineural loss of 40 dB or worse was utilized, brain-stem electric response audiometry was 94% sensitive, with a 96% specificity. For lesser degrees of hearing loss, the testing was considerably less sensitive, and the authors recommend that the 40-dB criterion http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery American Medical Association

Acoustic Value of Brain-stem Audiometry in Infancy

Acoustic Value of Brain-stem Audiometry in Infancy

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract At the 1989 meeting of the Triological Society in San Francisco, Calif, Drs Peter W. Alberti, Martyn L. Hyde, and Krista Riko, Toronto, Canada, presented a study regarding the validity of brain-stem audiometry in high-risk infants. The study group consisted of 731 high-risk infants comparing early brain-stem audiometry with results of later behavioral...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0886-4470
eISSN
1538-361X
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1989.01860350015005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract At the 1989 meeting of the Triological Society in San Francisco, Calif, Drs Peter W. Alberti, Martyn L. Hyde, and Krista Riko, Toronto, Canada, presented a study regarding the validity of brain-stem audiometry in high-risk infants. The study group consisted of 731 high-risk infants comparing early brain-stem audiometry with results of later behavioral testing done at ages 3 to 5 years. Children were initially selected for evaluation from a high-risk registry and underwent brain-stem electric response audiometry at 3 to 4 months of age. Approximately 5% had moderate-to-severe hearing losses. The infants who had conductive losses due to middle ear effusion were excluded from the study. When a threshold for sensorineural loss of 40 dB or worse was utilized, brain-stem electric response audiometry was 94% sensitive, with a 96% specificity. For lesser degrees of hearing loss, the testing was considerably less sensitive, and the authors recommend that the 40-dB criterion

Journal

Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1989

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