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Accuracy and Efficacy of Nuclear Scintigraphy for Detection of Gastrointestinal Bleeding-Reply

Accuracy and Efficacy of Nuclear Scintigraphy for Detection of Gastrointestinal Bleeding-Reply This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract I would agree that a prospective study would be better, but I only did a retrospective review of medical records. However, I believe that the data here are relevant, as many medical records were discarded because of incomplete information about test results or definitive findings. Currently, the protocol at this hospital, which is set up by the radiology department, includes direct injection of 12 mg of stannous pyrophosphate into the patient. After a 20-minute wait, 555 MBq of 99m-technetium-04 is injected directly into the patient. Immediate imaging is begun, and scanning is continued at 15-minute intervals. Delayed images are taken if ordered by the radiologist who is reviewing the films. I would agree that perhaps continuous scanning and an in vitro technique might give better results, but that is not included in our hospital's protocol. I would like to point out that this is a community hospital and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Accuracy and Efficacy of Nuclear Scintigraphy for Detection of Gastrointestinal Bleeding-Reply

Archives of Surgery , Volume 132 (9) – Sep 1, 1997

Accuracy and Efficacy of Nuclear Scintigraphy for Detection of Gastrointestinal Bleeding-Reply

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract I would agree that a prospective study would be better, but I only did a retrospective review of medical records. However, I believe that the data here are relevant, as many medical records were discarded because of incomplete information about test results or definitive findings. Currently, the protocol at this hospital, which is set up by the...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1997.01430330110023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract I would agree that a prospective study would be better, but I only did a retrospective review of medical records. However, I believe that the data here are relevant, as many medical records were discarded because of incomplete information about test results or definitive findings. Currently, the protocol at this hospital, which is set up by the radiology department, includes direct injection of 12 mg of stannous pyrophosphate into the patient. After a 20-minute wait, 555 MBq of 99m-technetium-04 is injected directly into the patient. Immediate imaging is begun, and scanning is continued at 15-minute intervals. Delayed images are taken if ordered by the radiologist who is reviewing the films. I would agree that perhaps continuous scanning and an in vitro technique might give better results, but that is not included in our hospital's protocol. I would like to point out that this is a community hospital and

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1997

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