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Abuse Dwarfism-Reply

Abuse Dwarfism-Reply Abstract In Reply.—Starvation is undoubtedly a form of child abuse, but to place undue emphasis on it oversimplifies a very complex situation. For example, in the classical study by Widdowson1 in which the nutritional intake of children in two European orphanages was carefully quantitated, the children in the abusing environment showed a striking improvement in weight gain when the harsh matron departed. The food ration available to them remained the same. Observations in middle-income and upper-income families indicate that growth failure may take place in environments that are nutritionally adequate but psychologically adverse.2.3 Many years ago, I was asked to see in consultation the daughter of a wealthy family in another country. Evaluation of the medical findings and of the affective environment strongly suggested that the growth failure of this "poor little rich girl" was associated with psychosocial deprivation. Surrounded by servants and the accoutrements of affluence, it References 1. Widdowson EM: Mental contentment and physical growth . Lancet 1:1316-1318, 1951.Crossref 2. VanderLaan WP: Discussion , in Gardner LI, Amacher P (eds): Endocrine Aspects of Malnutrition: Marasmus, Kwashiorkor and Psychosocial Deprivation . Santa Ynez, Calif, Kroc Foundation, 1973, p 125. 3. Drash A: Discussion , in Gardner LI, Amacher P (eds): Endocrine Aspects of Malnutrition: Marasmus, Kwashiorkor and Psychosocial Deprivation . Santa Ynez, Calif, Kroc Foundation, 1973, p 125. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Abuse Dwarfism-Reply

Abstract

Abstract In Reply.—Starvation is undoubtedly a form of child abuse, but to place undue emphasis on it oversimplifies a very complex situation. For example, in the classical study by Widdowson1 in which the nutritional intake of children in two European orphanages was carefully quantitated, the children in the abusing environment showed a striking improvement in weight gain when the harsh matron departed. The food ration available to them remained the same. Observations in middle-income...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1978 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1978.02120320084026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In Reply.—Starvation is undoubtedly a form of child abuse, but to place undue emphasis on it oversimplifies a very complex situation. For example, in the classical study by Widdowson1 in which the nutritional intake of children in two European orphanages was carefully quantitated, the children in the abusing environment showed a striking improvement in weight gain when the harsh matron departed. The food ration available to them remained the same. Observations in middle-income and upper-income families indicate that growth failure may take place in environments that are nutritionally adequate but psychologically adverse.2.3 Many years ago, I was asked to see in consultation the daughter of a wealthy family in another country. Evaluation of the medical findings and of the affective environment strongly suggested that the growth failure of this "poor little rich girl" was associated with psychosocial deprivation. Surrounded by servants and the accoutrements of affluence, it References 1. Widdowson EM: Mental contentment and physical growth . Lancet 1:1316-1318, 1951.Crossref 2. VanderLaan WP: Discussion , in Gardner LI, Amacher P (eds): Endocrine Aspects of Malnutrition: Marasmus, Kwashiorkor and Psychosocial Deprivation . Santa Ynez, Calif, Kroc Foundation, 1973, p 125. 3. Drash A: Discussion , in Gardner LI, Amacher P (eds): Endocrine Aspects of Malnutrition: Marasmus, Kwashiorkor and Psychosocial Deprivation . Santa Ynez, Calif, Kroc Foundation, 1973, p 125.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1978

References