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Abrupt Changes in Hair Morphology Following Corticosteroid Therapy in Alopecia Areata

Abrupt Changes in Hair Morphology Following Corticosteroid Therapy in Alopecia Areata Abstract A follicle within a lesion of alopecia areata may produce no perceptible hair, a very fine, short, vellus hair, or a hair only a little thinner and less pigmented than the normal product of that particular follicle. In the latter instance, there may occasionally be seen following intralesional injection of an appropriate corticosteroid suspension, or following systemic corticosteroid therapy, an abrupt transition to a thicker, more heavily pigmented structure, without interruption of the continuity of the shaft (Fig. 1). Later there may occur an equally abrupt return to a hair which is thinner and less pigmented (Fig. 2). This results in a segment of terminal hair of good caliber in between segments of vellus-type hair. Such instances tend to corroborate the belief that alopecia areata represents a rather delicate balance between the hair growth potential of the pilar apparatus and an unknown inhibitory factor. The follicle "tries" to produce its References 1. Van Scott, E. J.: Morphologic Changes in Pilosebaceous Units and Anagen Hairs in Alopecia Areata , J. Invest. Dermat. 31:35, 1958.Crossref 2. Van Scott, E. J., and Ekel, T. M.: Geometric Relationships Between the Matrix of the Hair Bulb and Its Dermal Papilla in Normal and Alopecic Scalp , J. Invest. Dermat. 31:281, 1958.Crossref 3. Radcliffe Crocker, H.: Diseases of the Skin , London, H. K. Lewis & Co., Ltd., 1888, p. 610. 4. Herrmann, F.; Morrill, S. D.; Sherwin, R. W.; Rothstein, M. J., and Sulzberger, M. B.: Factors Influencing the Incidence of Epidermal Methylcholanthrene Tumors in Mice Treated with Cortisone: III. Studies of the Hair Follicular Cycle ("Skin Cycle") in Relation to the Incidence of Tumors After Cortisone Administration , J. Invest. Dermat. 25:423, 1955.Crossref 5. Kanof, N. M.: Effect of Oral Steroid on Non-Inflammatory Scalp Ringworm , J. Invest. Dermat. 31:139, 1958.Crossref 6. Kim, J. H.: Personal communication to the authors (to be published). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Abrupt Changes in Hair Morphology Following Corticosteroid Therapy in Alopecia Areata

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1960 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1960.01580030102013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract A follicle within a lesion of alopecia areata may produce no perceptible hair, a very fine, short, vellus hair, or a hair only a little thinner and less pigmented than the normal product of that particular follicle. In the latter instance, there may occasionally be seen following intralesional injection of an appropriate corticosteroid suspension, or following systemic corticosteroid therapy, an abrupt transition to a thicker, more heavily pigmented structure, without interruption of the continuity of the shaft (Fig. 1). Later there may occur an equally abrupt return to a hair which is thinner and less pigmented (Fig. 2). This results in a segment of terminal hair of good caliber in between segments of vellus-type hair. Such instances tend to corroborate the belief that alopecia areata represents a rather delicate balance between the hair growth potential of the pilar apparatus and an unknown inhibitory factor. The follicle "tries" to produce its References 1. Van Scott, E. J.: Morphologic Changes in Pilosebaceous Units and Anagen Hairs in Alopecia Areata , J. Invest. Dermat. 31:35, 1958.Crossref 2. Van Scott, E. J., and Ekel, T. M.: Geometric Relationships Between the Matrix of the Hair Bulb and Its Dermal Papilla in Normal and Alopecic Scalp , J. Invest. Dermat. 31:281, 1958.Crossref 3. Radcliffe Crocker, H.: Diseases of the Skin , London, H. K. Lewis & Co., Ltd., 1888, p. 610. 4. Herrmann, F.; Morrill, S. D.; Sherwin, R. W.; Rothstein, M. J., and Sulzberger, M. B.: Factors Influencing the Incidence of Epidermal Methylcholanthrene Tumors in Mice Treated with Cortisone: III. Studies of the Hair Follicular Cycle ("Skin Cycle") in Relation to the Incidence of Tumors After Cortisone Administration , J. Invest. Dermat. 25:423, 1955.Crossref 5. Kanof, N. M.: Effect of Oral Steroid on Non-Inflammatory Scalp Ringworm , J. Invest. Dermat. 31:139, 1958.Crossref 6. Kim, J. H.: Personal communication to the authors (to be published).

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1960

References