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A Step in the Long Climb Back

A Step in the Long Climb Back Abstract Research in otolaryngology is in a period of decline for a variety of reasons, and the long-term implications of this fact will be seen in the clinical practice of our speciality during the next two decades.1 We must succeed in reversing this decline and avoid the expense and suffering associated with inadequate scientific foundations for health care provision in the future. It will be a long climb back to a healthy plateau of investigational activity, but we cannot afford to delay the journey any longer. We recognize that, in many of the issues we must face, the obstacles are internal ("we have met the enemy, and they is us," as Pogo noted several years ago). The decline in the number of grant applications from otolaryngologists is a dramatic and critical problem. The current research effort in otolaryngology is inadequate, and the implications of this sad fact are important to References 1. Bailey BJ: Research in otolaryngology: Who needs it? Arch Otolaryngol 1981;107:589.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

A Step in the Long Climb Back

Abstract

Abstract Research in otolaryngology is in a period of decline for a variety of reasons, and the long-term implications of this fact will be seen in the clinical practice of our speciality during the next two decades.1 We must succeed in reversing this decline and avoid the expense and suffering associated with inadequate scientific foundations for health care provision in the future. It will be a long climb back to a healthy plateau of investigational activity, but we cannot afford to delay...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1982 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1982.00790510001001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Research in otolaryngology is in a period of decline for a variety of reasons, and the long-term implications of this fact will be seen in the clinical practice of our speciality during the next two decades.1 We must succeed in reversing this decline and avoid the expense and suffering associated with inadequate scientific foundations for health care provision in the future. It will be a long climb back to a healthy plateau of investigational activity, but we cannot afford to delay the journey any longer. We recognize that, in many of the issues we must face, the obstacles are internal ("we have met the enemy, and they is us," as Pogo noted several years ago). The decline in the number of grant applications from otolaryngologists is a dramatic and critical problem. The current research effort in otolaryngology is inadequate, and the implications of this sad fact are important to References 1. Bailey BJ: Research in otolaryngology: Who needs it? Arch Otolaryngol 1981;107:589.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1982

References

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