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A Serum Anticoagulant Factor in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

A Serum Anticoagulant Factor in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Abstract The concept of lupus erythematosus as an immunologic disease is gaining popularity. Certain cases of lupus erythematosus present as hemolytic anemia, and the Coombs test may be positive in these, and indeed may reveal the presence of circulating antibodies in other cases of lupus erythematosus in which hemolysis is not apparent. A false-positive serology is also an indication of an immunologic reaction. It is of great interest, therefore, to find lupus erythematosus associated with any other immunologic phenomenon. Recently the attention of hematologists has been drawn to a small number of patients with a hemorrhagic disturbance due to a circulating anticoagulant. There is evidence that in some of these cases the anticoagulant is formed by an immunologic process. Craddock and Lawrence have reported the development of an anticoagulant in hemophilia following repeated therapy with blood, plasma, or antihemophilic globulin.1 Several anticoagulant factors have been References 1. References 2, 3, and 4. 2. References 5 and 6. 3. Pirofsky, B.: unpublished data. 4. Craddock, C. G., Jr., and Lawrence, J. S.: Hemophilia, a Report of the Mechanism of the Development and Action of an Anticoagulant in 2 Cases , Blood 2:505, 1947. 5. Conley, C. L., and Hartmen, R. C.: A Hemorrhagic Disorder Caused by Circulating Anticoagulant in Patients with Disseminated Lupus Erythematosus , J. Clin. Invest. 31:621, 1952. 6. Lee, S. L., and Sanders, M.: A Disorder of Blood Coagulation in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus , abstracted, Clin. Res. Proc. 2:33, 1954. 7. Meacham, G. C., and Weisburger, A. S.: Unusual Manifestations of Disseminated Lupus Erythematosus , Ann. Int. Med. 43:143, 1955.Crossref 8. Fantl, P., and Nance, M.: An Acquired Hemorrhagic Disease in a Female Due to an Inhibitor of Blood Coagulation , M. J. Australia 2:125, 1946. 9. Harrington, W. J.; Desforges, J. F.; Stohlman, F.; Crow, C. B., and Moloney, W. C.: Studies on a Case of Acute Antithromboplastinemia , J. Lab. & Clin. Med. 36:87, 1950. 10. Dameshek, W., and Stefanini, M.: The Hemorrhagic Disorders , New York, Grune & Stratton, Inc., 1955. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

A Serum Anticoagulant Factor in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology , Volume 74 (3) – Sep 1, 1956

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1956 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-5359
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1956.01550090070014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The concept of lupus erythematosus as an immunologic disease is gaining popularity. Certain cases of lupus erythematosus present as hemolytic anemia, and the Coombs test may be positive in these, and indeed may reveal the presence of circulating antibodies in other cases of lupus erythematosus in which hemolysis is not apparent. A false-positive serology is also an indication of an immunologic reaction. It is of great interest, therefore, to find lupus erythematosus associated with any other immunologic phenomenon. Recently the attention of hematologists has been drawn to a small number of patients with a hemorrhagic disturbance due to a circulating anticoagulant. There is evidence that in some of these cases the anticoagulant is formed by an immunologic process. Craddock and Lawrence have reported the development of an anticoagulant in hemophilia following repeated therapy with blood, plasma, or antihemophilic globulin.1 Several anticoagulant factors have been References 1. References 2, 3, and 4. 2. References 5 and 6. 3. Pirofsky, B.: unpublished data. 4. Craddock, C. G., Jr., and Lawrence, J. S.: Hemophilia, a Report of the Mechanism of the Development and Action of an Anticoagulant in 2 Cases , Blood 2:505, 1947. 5. Conley, C. L., and Hartmen, R. C.: A Hemorrhagic Disorder Caused by Circulating Anticoagulant in Patients with Disseminated Lupus Erythematosus , J. Clin. Invest. 31:621, 1952. 6. Lee, S. L., and Sanders, M.: A Disorder of Blood Coagulation in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus , abstracted, Clin. Res. Proc. 2:33, 1954. 7. Meacham, G. C., and Weisburger, A. S.: Unusual Manifestations of Disseminated Lupus Erythematosus , Ann. Int. Med. 43:143, 1955.Crossref 8. Fantl, P., and Nance, M.: An Acquired Hemorrhagic Disease in a Female Due to an Inhibitor of Blood Coagulation , M. J. Australia 2:125, 1946. 9. Harrington, W. J.; Desforges, J. F.; Stohlman, F.; Crow, C. B., and Moloney, W. C.: Studies on a Case of Acute Antithromboplastinemia , J. Lab. & Clin. Med. 36:87, 1950. 10. Dameshek, W., and Stefanini, M.: The Hemorrhagic Disorders , New York, Grune & Stratton, Inc., 1955.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1956

References