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A Self-Illuminating Intravitreous Cryoprobe

A Self-Illuminating Intravitreous Cryoprobe Abstract Severe complications associated with the extraction of the dislocated lens have made many surgeons hesitant to operate in such cases. However, with cryoextraction of the lens, using a controllable probe inserted into the eye at ambient (room) temperature, the operative risk is greatly reduced. Previous work in cryoextraction of the dislocated lens1 described the use of a double-pronged needle, which was inserted with the patient in a prone position, to trap and support the lens prior to cryoextraction. Frequently, the probe had to be applied a few times before good contact with the lens was obtained. This was due to refraction of light rays by the vitreous anterior to the lens, disturbing the operator's judgment of depth. The technique was not entirely satisfactory mainly because of the damage inflicted to the pars plana by insertion of the double-pronged needle. It was impossible to remove a lens fixed to the References 1. Amoils, S.P.: The Joule Thomson Cryoprobe , Arch Ophthal 78:201-207 ( (Aug) ) 1967.Crossref 2. Amoils, S.P., and Simmons, RJ.: Goniotomy With Internal Illumination , Arch Ophthal 80:488-491 ( (Oct) ) 1968.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

A Self-Illuminating Intravitreous Cryoprobe

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 80 (4) – Oct 1, 1968

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1968 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1968.00980050486014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Severe complications associated with the extraction of the dislocated lens have made many surgeons hesitant to operate in such cases. However, with cryoextraction of the lens, using a controllable probe inserted into the eye at ambient (room) temperature, the operative risk is greatly reduced. Previous work in cryoextraction of the dislocated lens1 described the use of a double-pronged needle, which was inserted with the patient in a prone position, to trap and support the lens prior to cryoextraction. Frequently, the probe had to be applied a few times before good contact with the lens was obtained. This was due to refraction of light rays by the vitreous anterior to the lens, disturbing the operator's judgment of depth. The technique was not entirely satisfactory mainly because of the damage inflicted to the pars plana by insertion of the double-pronged needle. It was impossible to remove a lens fixed to the References 1. Amoils, S.P.: The Joule Thomson Cryoprobe , Arch Ophthal 78:201-207 ( (Aug) ) 1967.Crossref 2. Amoils, S.P., and Simmons, RJ.: Goniotomy With Internal Illumination , Arch Ophthal 80:488-491 ( (Oct) ) 1968.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1968

References