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A SCLEROTOME

A SCLEROTOME Abstract An ideal instrument for scleral incisions to admit the tip of the magnet in extracting foreign bodies from the vitreous chamber should not penetrate too deeply and must be sharp and strong. When, as is usual, a cataract knife is used for this purpose, it must be plunged at least half its length in order to cut the tough sclera with the middle of the blade. Afterward, if the vitreous is viewed with the slit-lamp, the path of the knife can be recognized as well as the transit of the foreign body across the vitreous body. In order to obviate unnecessary traumatization of the vitreous and at the same time to obtain a satisfactory, almost painless, scleral incision, I have devised an instrument which enables one to accomplish easily the classic requirements of sclerotomy. Sclerotome. This instrument has the usual eye-knife handle with a blade 11 mm. long http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

A SCLEROTOME

Abstract

Abstract An ideal instrument for scleral incisions to admit the tip of the magnet in extracting foreign bodies from the vitreous chamber should not penetrate too deeply and must be sharp and strong. When, as is usual, a cataract knife is used for this purpose, it must be plunged at least half its length in order to cut the tough sclera with the middle of the blade. Afterward, if the vitreous is viewed with the slit-lamp, the path of the knife can be recognized as well as the transit of the...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1930 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1930.00810080109010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract An ideal instrument for scleral incisions to admit the tip of the magnet in extracting foreign bodies from the vitreous chamber should not penetrate too deeply and must be sharp and strong. When, as is usual, a cataract knife is used for this purpose, it must be plunged at least half its length in order to cut the tough sclera with the middle of the blade. Afterward, if the vitreous is viewed with the slit-lamp, the path of the knife can be recognized as well as the transit of the foreign body across the vitreous body. In order to obviate unnecessary traumatization of the vitreous and at the same time to obtain a satisfactory, almost painless, scleral incision, I have devised an instrument which enables one to accomplish easily the classic requirements of sclerotomy. Sclerotome. This instrument has the usual eye-knife handle with a blade 11 mm. long

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1930

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