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A RETENTIVE APPARATUS FOR FRACTURES OF THE CLAVICLE.

A RETENTIVE APPARATUS FOR FRACTURES OF THE CLAVICLE. In the clinical work at the surgical dispensary of the University of California the Sayre adhesive plaster dressing has been used for some time as a routine treatment for fractures of the clavicle. In many cases the results attained were good, but the method of treatment failed in a number of instances. It was not until several of these failures followed closely on one another that the necessity for a better method of treatment became imperative. The mostpronounced failures were in those rare cases of fractured clavicle which presented great overlapping of the fragments and in which it was impossible to maintain reduction by the ordinary methods. A glance over the literature was not reassuring. More methods of treatment have probably been suggested for this fracture than for any other. Pilcher sums up the matter by saying: "The fact remains that those methods which are efficient are intolerable and those http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

A RETENTIVE APPARATUS FOR FRACTURES OF THE CLAVICLE.

JAMA , Volume XLV (15) – Oct 7, 1905

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1905 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1905.52510150050004b
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the clinical work at the surgical dispensary of the University of California the Sayre adhesive plaster dressing has been used for some time as a routine treatment for fractures of the clavicle. In many cases the results attained were good, but the method of treatment failed in a number of instances. It was not until several of these failures followed closely on one another that the necessity for a better method of treatment became imperative. The mostpronounced failures were in those rare cases of fractured clavicle which presented great overlapping of the fragments and in which it was impossible to maintain reduction by the ordinary methods. A glance over the literature was not reassuring. More methods of treatment have probably been suggested for this fracture than for any other. Pilcher sums up the matter by saying: "The fact remains that those methods which are efficient are intolerable and those

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 7, 1905

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