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A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Aspirin in Persons Recovered From Myocardial Infarction

A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Aspirin in Persons Recovered From Myocardial Infarction The Aspirin Myocardial Infarction Study (AMIS) was a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial designed to test whether the regular administration of aspirin to men and women who had experienced at least one documented myocardial infarction (MI) would result in a significant reduction in total mortality over a three-year period. Cause-specific mortality, nonfatal events, and side effects were also evaluated. Over a 13-month period, 4,524 persons between the ages of 30 and 69 years were randomized to either 1 g of aspirin per day (2,267 persons) or placebo (2,257 persons). High levels of patient compliance to study protocol were indicated by various measures. Total mortality during the entire follow-up period was 10.8% in the aspirin group and 9.7% in the placebo group. Three-year total mortality was 9.6% in the aspirin group and 8.8% in the placebo group. The percentage of definite nonfatal MI was 8.1% in the placebo group and 6.3% in the aspirin group. Coronary incidence (coronary heart disease mortality or definite nonfatal MI) was 14.1% in the aspirin group and 14.8% in the placebo group. Symptoms suggestive of peptic ulcer, gastritis, or erosion of gastric mucosa occurred in 23.7% of the aspirin group and 14.9% in the placebo group. Based on AMIS results, aspirin is not recommended for routine use in patients who have survived an MI. (JAMA 243:661-669, 1980) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Aspirin in Persons Recovered From Myocardial Infarction

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JAMA , Volume 243 (7) – Feb 15, 1980

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1980 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1980.03300330019023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Aspirin Myocardial Infarction Study (AMIS) was a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial designed to test whether the regular administration of aspirin to men and women who had experienced at least one documented myocardial infarction (MI) would result in a significant reduction in total mortality over a three-year period. Cause-specific mortality, nonfatal events, and side effects were also evaluated. Over a 13-month period, 4,524 persons between the ages of 30 and 69 years were randomized to either 1 g of aspirin per day (2,267 persons) or placebo (2,257 persons). High levels of patient compliance to study protocol were indicated by various measures. Total mortality during the entire follow-up period was 10.8% in the aspirin group and 9.7% in the placebo group. Three-year total mortality was 9.6% in the aspirin group and 8.8% in the placebo group. The percentage of definite nonfatal MI was 8.1% in the placebo group and 6.3% in the aspirin group. Coronary incidence (coronary heart disease mortality or definite nonfatal MI) was 14.1% in the aspirin group and 14.8% in the placebo group. Symptoms suggestive of peptic ulcer, gastritis, or erosion of gastric mucosa occurred in 23.7% of the aspirin group and 14.9% in the placebo group. Based on AMIS results, aspirin is not recommended for routine use in patients who have survived an MI. (JAMA 243:661-669, 1980)

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 15, 1980

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