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A Preliminary Note on the Use of Chlorpromazine with Neuropsychiatric Disorders

A Preliminary Note on the Use of Chlorpromazine with Neuropsychiatric Disorders Abstract Psychiatric history is replete with many and varied claims of a pharmacological cure for mental diseases. However, few of these claims have withstood the test of rigorous experimentation. Probably the outstanding form of this type of treatment in use today is insulin. However, this treatment has its drawbacks in the form of expense, time, and the necessity of constant supervision. Various drugs, such as the barbiturates, have been used to quiet actively disturbed patients, as has electric shock and hibernotherapy.3 All of these forms have their liabilities in requiring constant supervision or in leaving the patient in a comatose state for varying periods and, as a result, less accessible than before administration. The lack of accessibility following these accepted treatments is probably the main criticism to be leveled at them. The treatment quiets the patient temporarily but prevents any immediate further treatment in the form of psychotherapy and does References 1. References 1 through 3. 2. Lehmann, H. E., and Hanrahan, G. E.: Chlorpromazine: New Inhibiting Agent for Psychomotor Excitement and Manic States , A. M. A. Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 71:227 ( (Feb.) ) 1954. 3. Winkleman, N. W.: Chlorpromazine: A New Drug in the Treatment of Neuropsychiatric Disorders , J. A. M. A. 155:18 ( (May 1) ) 1954. 4. Wortis, J.: Review of Psychiatric Progress 1953: Physiological Treatment , Am. J. Psychiat. 110:507 ( (Jan.) ) 1954. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry American Medical Association

A Preliminary Note on the Use of Chlorpromazine with Neuropsychiatric Disorders

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1955 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6886
DOI
10.1001/archneurpsyc.1955.02330120104011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Psychiatric history is replete with many and varied claims of a pharmacological cure for mental diseases. However, few of these claims have withstood the test of rigorous experimentation. Probably the outstanding form of this type of treatment in use today is insulin. However, this treatment has its drawbacks in the form of expense, time, and the necessity of constant supervision. Various drugs, such as the barbiturates, have been used to quiet actively disturbed patients, as has electric shock and hibernotherapy.3 All of these forms have their liabilities in requiring constant supervision or in leaving the patient in a comatose state for varying periods and, as a result, less accessible than before administration. The lack of accessibility following these accepted treatments is probably the main criticism to be leveled at them. The treatment quiets the patient temporarily but prevents any immediate further treatment in the form of psychotherapy and does References 1. References 1 through 3. 2. Lehmann, H. E., and Hanrahan, G. E.: Chlorpromazine: New Inhibiting Agent for Psychomotor Excitement and Manic States , A. M. A. Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 71:227 ( (Feb.) ) 1954. 3. Winkleman, N. W.: Chlorpromazine: A New Drug in the Treatment of Neuropsychiatric Disorders , J. A. M. A. 155:18 ( (May 1) ) 1954. 4. Wortis, J.: Review of Psychiatric Progress 1953: Physiological Treatment , Am. J. Psychiat. 110:507 ( (Jan.) ) 1954.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of Neurology & PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1955

References