Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

A NOTE ON THE ACADEMIC LIFE

A NOTE ON THE ACADEMIC LIFE This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract The academic life, like the bricklayer's life, must be lived according to the lights of the individual. But there are in each of these, as in the life of a person of any grade or calling, certain elements that characterize it. And those that characterize the academic life have a charm and richness traditional in speech and literature. Take, for instance, a professor of the classics. He is usually a personable man, with a mellow taste in books, music, pictures, fabrics and furniture, ready with a jest or a sober comment. He is a scholar of the first water, able to trace his roots and his terminations, a familiar of the heroes of his literature as well as of those creatures that burrow in the depths of libraries beneath the clear surface waters in which the rest of us splash. He is a teacher in the true sense, the man http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

A NOTE ON THE ACADEMIC LIFE

Archives of Surgery , Volume 18 (4) – Apr 1, 1929

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/a-note-on-the-academic-life-0wwti5iGte
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1929 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1929.01140130300015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract The academic life, like the bricklayer's life, must be lived according to the lights of the individual. But there are in each of these, as in the life of a person of any grade or calling, certain elements that characterize it. And those that characterize the academic life have a charm and richness traditional in speech and literature. Take, for instance, a professor of the classics. He is usually a personable man, with a mellow taste in books, music, pictures, fabrics and furniture, ready with a jest or a sober comment. He is a scholar of the first water, able to trace his roots and his terminations, a familiar of the heroes of his literature as well as of those creatures that burrow in the depths of libraries beneath the clear surface waters in which the rest of us splash. He is a teacher in the true sense, the man

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1929

There are no references for this article.